Tag Archives: South America

More 21 Divisiones

Spirit World of Dominican VuduVODOUN – 21 NATIONS UNDER GOD SANCE TRADITION

From thebestlovespell, 2013 [Edited]

Contrary to popular belief the first Africans to set foot on Puerto Rico or the Americas for that matter where free men. Even as late as 150, a West African man who was the son of a Yoruba King and later baptized “Juan Garrido” was an African Conquistador who worked for Juan Ponce de Leon, “Puerto Rico’s first Governor” and was the first African man to set foot on Puerto Rican soil after the European ‘conquest’ and almost 100 years prior to the first Africans caught in the European slavery system to be taken to the United States “Jamestown 1607”.  Another African man, called Pedro Mejías, was married to the last Cacica Chief of Puerto Rico, Yuiza who like Pedro Mejias, was baptized a Catholic and renamed “Luisa” in order for both to be legally wed under Spanish law. Like the Dominican Anacaona in the Agua Dulce Division, Yuiza was the last female Cacica “Chief” to then become part of the Spirits venerated in Puerto Rican Sance.

Like the European enslavers, the African people came from different societies and tribes, each having their own dialect, language and culture. Haitian Vodou or Voudun consists of 21 Nations or Nasyons of Lwa – what Dominicans call los Loases or Misterios de La 21 Divisiones (also known as Budű or Vudű Dominicano.) Continue reading

Chan Chan

Chan-Chan, The timeless citadel of clay
From Machu Picchu Gateway [edited]

This enormous archaeological complex is located in front of the sea, half way between the Huanchaco hot springs and the city of Trujillo, which is the capital of the department of Lambayeque, in the north coast of Perú.

The site covers an extension of 20 km; the central zone is formed by 10 places with walls, called citadels, a few structures with a pyramidal shape, and the rest is formed by sidewalks, walls and cemeteries in bad shape.

The heart of Chan-Chan is formed by 10 citadels, called that way because of its big volume, resembling small cities with big walls. The way that Chan-Chan was built shows the status of each layer of its the society, located in different areas. Continue reading

Symbol Thievery

http://themindunleashed.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/all-seeing.jpg The All-Seeing Eye: Sacred Origins of a Hijacked Symbol
By The Mind Unleashed, August 11 2014

The all-seeing eye is a powerful esoteric symbol which is widely misunderstood and misused today; few know what it originally stood for. It was originally symbolic of a higher spiritual power or God, a watchful caretaker of humanity or an awakened spiritual part within. But these days it has quite different associations.

Today the all-seeing eye is more likely to be seen as an “Illuminati” symbol of control and surveillance by elites who to a large degree run the show on this planet at this time. This is because, over time, dark sinister forces have taken over esoteric symbols that for thousands of years were used to convey Continue reading

Oya Yansan

Oya - Lazaro BrandNinth child – Oya
From The Yoruba Religious Concepts

Not unlike her sisters, Oya Llasan Yansan, brought a physical beauty to the world. Her appearance also brought great conflict to the orisa. Oya had eyes of amber they where large and round and very expressive. When the people made eye contact with her, they would fall under her spell. With her birth into the kingdom also came the breath of life and movement of air, great storms and tornadoes.

Although she was female and feminine, She had a strong temperament and when she was forced to she would assume the personality of a masculine warrior in battle as well as lead others into war fighting as a equal at their side. Oya had the soul of a Continue reading

Oya

Oya - Dylan MeconisOya – Great Orisha goddess of Wind, Storms and Guardian Between Worlds
From African American Wiccan Society

Oya is a Great Yoruban Orisha. She is the goddess of Storms and Winds, and Her realm ranges from rainbows to thunder.  Her name means “She Who Tore” in Yoruba.  She can manifest as winds ranging from the gentlest breeze to the raging hurricane or cyclone.

Oya is known as a fierce Warrior goddess and a strong Protectress of women, who call upon Her. She assists us with rapid inner and outer transformation. Oya, is about absolute change (especially for the good) and is not a slow or very patient energy. According to Luisah Teish in the book, Jambalaya, Continue reading

Brazilian Macumba

Learn Moor About Bahia Brasil | Salvador Bahia | Afro Brazilian: Orishá Statues at Dique Do ...Macumba

“Macumba” (also known as Quimbanda) is the everyday term used by Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro to describe two types of African spirit worship: Candomble (followed in northern State of Bahia) and Umbanda (a newer form originating in Niteroi in the southern State of Rio de Janeiro).

Macumba originated with enslaved Africans shipped to Brazil in the 1550s, who continued to worship African Gods. Their Gods are called ORIXAS (Orisha). Africans incorporated their religion into Brazilian culture and white European religion (Roman Catholic). They summoned their Gods with their drums. European enslavers, unlike those in the United States, allowed Africans to continue to use their drums. Thus began the rhythm of the saints, the samba, and it explains why Brazilian “batucadas” reign unequaled today. Brazil got the samba, and the U.S. got “the blues.” Continue reading

Wata Mama

yemay - shepsaritesMami Wata

Myth of mermaids is popular all around the world, but the African water spirit Mami Wata remained respected and celebrated from the time before the African nations came in contact with Europe, through the ages, and even up to today where she is venerated in West, Central, Southern Africa and the diaspora in Americas. She represented one of the most powerful goddesses in the African religion of Voudun (not to be mistaken to the newer and more heavily publicized Voodoo) and is today celebrated as a goddess that must be both loved and feared.

As with many other old mermaid deities such as Assyrian Astarte, Babylonian Ishtar and Greek Aphrodite, she is regarded as an immortal spirit that personifies polar opposites, such as of beauty and danger, natural force and healing, Continue reading

Yemaya

Yemaya - tdmYemaya
By Santeria Church of the Orishas

Yemaya (also spelled Yemoja, Iemoja, or Yemayá) is one of the most powerful orishas in Santeria. She is the mother of all living things, rules over motherhood and owns all the waters of the Earth. She gave birth to the stars, the moon, the sun and most of the orishas. Yemaya makes her residence in life-giving portion of the ocean (although some of her roads can be found in lagoons or lakes in the forest). Yemaya’s aché is nurturing, protective and fruitful. Yemaya is just as much a loving mother orisha as she is a fierce warrior that kills anyone who threatens her children.

Yemaya can be found in all the waters of the world, and because of this she has many aspects of “caminos” (roads), each reflecting the nature of different bodies of water. She, like Oshún, carries all of the Continue reading

Orishas

Orishas by Noire3000 James C. LewisThe Orishas
From Orishanet

The orishas are the emissaries of Olodumare or God almighty. They rule over the forces of nature and the endeavors of humanity. They recognise themselves and are recognised through their different numbers and colors which are their marks, and each has their own favorite foods and other things which they like to receive as offerings and gifts. In this way we make our offerings in the manner they are accustomed to, in the way they have always received them, so that they will recognise our offerings and come to our aid.

The orishas are often best understood by observing the forces of nature they rule over. For instance, you can learn much about Oshún and her children by watching the rivers and streams she rules over and observing that though she always heads toward her sister Yemayá (the Sea) she does so on her own Continue reading

Oshun Lures Ogun

Oshun OrishaOshún Lures Ogún From the Forest
From Orishanet

Though he worked in the city as the blacksmith of orishas and humanity, part of Ogún’s heart always remained in the forest. As the years went by, Ogún began to tire of the city and the constant work he had to perform. Though he remembered having cursed himself before Obatalá to a life of hard labor, he began to feel he was powerful enough that none of the orishas had the strength to stop him from doing whatever he felt like doing. And what he wanted to do was to retreat to the forest and leave the the city Ilé Ifé and all his troubles behind. So one day, without warning, he merely disappeared into the forest.

It didn’t take long for his absence to become noticed as virtually everything ground to a halt for want of a blacksmith to create the tools necessary for day to day life. One by one, all the orishas with the Continue reading

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