Tag Archives: Africa

Merit Ptah

Related imageMerit Ptah

Merit Ptah (“Beloved of the god Ptah”; c. 2700 BCE) was an early physician in ancient Egypt. She is most notable for being the first woman known by name in the history of the field of medicine. Her picture can be seen on a tomb in the necropolis near the step pyramid of Saqqara. Her son, who was a High Priest, described her as “the Chief Physician.”

The physician Merit Ptah should not be confused with Merit-Ptah, the wife of Ramose, the Governor of Thebes and Vizier under Akhenaten, who is depicted with her husband in TT55 in Sheikh Abd el-Qurna.

Modern Legacy
The International Astronomical Union named the impact crater Merit Ptah on Venus after her

Source: Wikipedia

 

 

Shen – Shining Mirror

Shen

The Egyptian Shen-Ring,
symbol of all symbols,
represents the coming together
of the linear ordinary way of being
and the global plenary one
– in two words: time and eternity.
The art of passing from the one to the other,
and linking them at will,
is the secret of all dynamism and freedom.

— Medhananda

The shen ring is at first glance a circle with a horizontal line in a tangent along its bottom edge. However the shen is more than meets the eye. The Shen is a symbol which represents eternity. The more elongated version is known as a “Shenu”. It is used to house the name of someone in Mtu Ntr or hieroglyphics. Once a name was placed within it, it was thought to protect that person from negativity.

Deriving its name from the root shenu (to encircle), it was almost always a symbol of eternity. However, the shen ring also held the idea of “protection.” It most often carried this connotation when seen in its elongated variation, the cartouche; which surrounded the birth and throne names of the Pharaohs. Continue reading

KMT Library

Imagine similarăFrom The Ancient Kemetic Roots of Library and Information Science
By Itibari M. Zulu

A Library: A Literature

An obvious axiom in any discussion of libraries is that one must first have a literature in order to have a library. In this regard, Kemet was rich: (1) the Egyptian language is the oldest written (via hieroglyphics) language in existence (McWhirter, 1982, 166); (2) evidence of a literature is present in the library of Akhenaton (Amenhotep/Amenophis, IV) which contains numerous clay tablets/books in cuneiform writing representing diplomatic correspondence between Amenhotep III, Akhenaton’s father, and nation‑states subject to Egypt (Metzger, 1980, 211); (3) the Palermo Stone, a book of annals of Kemet mentioning Seshait (Seshat/Sesheta) as the goddess of libraries, writing, and letters (Richardson, 1914, 58‑60); and (4) the text of the Precepts of Ptah‑hotep, one of the first (c. 4000 B.C.) philosophical compositions (composed 2,000 years before the Ten Commandments of Moses and 2,500 years before the Proverbs of Solomon), engraved in stone (Nichols, 1964, 33‑34).

Hence literature in ancient Kemet was common and varied in its form. Sometimes it was on papyrus and at other times it was carved/engraved in stone (c. 2700 B.C.) on the walls of temples (library‑universities), pyramids, and other monuments (Nichols, 1964, 32). Fortunately, works written in stone have survived, to provide unequivocal evidence of an extensive Kemetic tradition.7 Continue reading

Heh and Hauhet

Related imageHeh and Hauhet, Deities of Infinity and Eternity
By Caroline Seawright

The ancient Egyptians [KMT] believed that before the world was formed, there was a watery mass of dark, directionless chaos. In this chaos lived the Ogdoad of Khmunu (Hermopolis), four frog gods and four snake goddesses of chaos. These deities were Nun and Naunet (water), Amun and Amaunet (invisibility), Heh and Hauhet (infinity) and Kek and Kauket (darkness).

The water stretched infinitely off in all directions, as ever lasting as time itself. Heh and Hauhet came to symbolise infinity. After time began, Heh and Hauhet came to symbolise limitless time, and long life.

Heh Holding Two Palm Fronds, Seated on the Symbol for Gold and Holding the Ankh Sign of Life

HEH

h

h

million determinative

The frog or human headed god Heh (Huh) was one of the original eight gods of the Ogdoad of Khmunu Continue reading

KMT PI

Related imageSacred Geometry in Ancient Egypt
By M. Gadalla

The Cosmic Geometry
Herodotus, the father of history and a native Greek, stated in 500 BCE:

Now, let me talk more of Egypt for it has a lot of admirable things and what one sees there is superior to any other country.

The Ancient Egyptian works, large or small, are admired by all, because they are proportionally harmonious and as such appeal to our inner as well as outer feelings. This harmonic design concept is popularly known as sacred geometry—where all figures could be drawn or created using a straight line (not even necessarily a ruler) and compass, i.e. without measurement (dependent on proportion only).

The principles of sacred geometry are of Ancient Egyptian origin, which constituted the basis of harmonic proportions, as evident in their temples, buildings, theology, …etc. The Ancient Egyptian design followed these principles in well-detailed canons. Plato himself attested to the longevity of the Egyptian harmonic canon of proportion (sacred geometry), when he stated, “the pictures and statues made ten thousand years ago…”

The key to divine harmonic proportion (sacred geometry) is the relationship between progression of Continue reading

Grab Hold of N’kisi

Male Nkisi Figure with Strips of Hide, held at the  Brooklyn Museum, CC

Nkisi

Nkisi (plural minkisi, zinkisi or nkisi [n- concords with mi-] according to dialect). The term nkisi is the general name for a a spirit, or for any object that spirit inhabits. It is frequently applied to a variety of objects used throughout the Congo Basin in Central Africa thought to contain spiritual powers or spirits. The term and its concept have passed with the enslavement of Africans into the Americas, especially South America (in Palo Mayombe the spirits of nkisi are often called “[…]”).

Meaning
The current meaning of the term derives from the root, *-kitį- referring to a spiritual entity, or material objects in which it is manifested or inhabits in Proto-Njila, an ancient subdivision of the Bantu language family.

In its earliest attestations in Kikongo dialects in the early seventeenth century it was spelled “mokissie” (in Dutch), as the mu- prefix in this noun class were still pronounced, and was reported by Dutch visitors to Loango as referring both to a material item and the spiritual entity that inhabits it. In the sixteenth century, when the Kingdom of Kongo was converted to Christianity, ukisi (a substance having characteristics of nkisi) was used to translate “holy” in the Kikongo Catechism of 1624. Continue reading

Ruin of Kemet

https://i2.wp.com/api.ning.com/files/PofT6NSEc2cWM4OymvKrZZR99SO7aqlie8mYWSra-1nEoGYPEAz7CxqqX0bNZU2V4HTBOuZXkz1ehs9aQN3SfRlzRE*4LAkA/6327503WavesofArabConquest.jpgA Short History of Egypt – to about 1970
[Unknown Student, Stanford University]

See Part 1 (Chapter 9)

Chapter 15. The Arab Conquest.
Until the end of the 6th century Arabia (except for the fertile Yemen is the South) was a land of nomadic tribes, fighting with each other, trading on the caravan routes, with no semblance of political unity, and polytheistic in religion. A hundred years later these desert Arabs, unified and disciplined by the new faith preached by Mohamed, had conquered in the name of Islam Syria, Mesopotamia, Persia, some of Turkestan and India, Egypt, northern Africa and Spain.

This extraordinary transformation does not seem to have been initially due to any fanatical desire to spread the new religion; in fact the Arabs made no great effort to convert the peoples they conquered. Continue reading