Tag Archives: Babylon

Ur

Ur-Nassiriyah.jpgUr

Ur (Sumerian: Urim; Akkadian: Uru; Arabic: أور‎) was an important Sumerian city-state in ancient Mesopotamia, located at the site of modern Tell el-Muqayyar in south Iraq’s Dhi Qar Governorate.

Although Ur was once a coastal city near the mouth of the Euphrates on the Persian Gulf, the coastline has shifted and the city is now well inland, south of the Euphrates on its right bank, 16 kilometres (9.9 mi) from Nasiriyah.

The city dates from the Ubaid period circa 3800 BC, and is recorded in written history as a City State from the 26th century BC, its first recorded king being Mesh-Ane-pada. The city’s patron deity was Nanna (in Akkadian, Sin), the Sumerian and Continue reading

Dem Demons – 2

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Part 1

Pre-Talmudic Demonology.

Upon pre-Talmudic demonology new light has been thrown by the “Testament of Solomon,” translated by Conybeare in “Jew. Quart. Rev.” (1898, xi. 1-45), a work which, notwithstanding many Christian interpolations, is of ancient Jewish origin and related to the “Book of Healing” (“Sefer Refu’ot”) ascribed to King Solomon (see Pes. iv. 9; Josephus, l.c.; Schürer, “Geseh.” iii. 300). In this “Testament” it is told that by the help of a magic ring with the seal of Pentalpha, Lilith-like vampires, Beelzebub, and all kinds of demons and unclean spirits were brought before Solomon, to whom they disclosed their secrets and told how they could be mastered. It contains incantations against certain diseases, and specifies the task allotted to each of the chief demons in the erection of the Temple.

The latter was a favorite theme of the Haggadists (Pesiḳ. R. vi.; Soṭah 48b; Giṭ. 68a). The later Haggadah ascribed to Moses this power to Continue reading

Dem Demons – 1

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Systematic knowledge concerning demons or evil spirits. Demons (Greek, δαίμονες or δαιμόνια; Hebrew, [Deut. xxxii. 17; Ps. cvi. 37] and [Lev. xvii. 7; II Chron. xi. 15; A. V. “devils”; Luther, “Feldgeister” and “Feldteufel”]; Aramaic, or rabbinical, and as spirits animating all elements of life and inhabiting all parts of the world, have their place in the primitive belief of all tribes and races. When certain deities rose to be the objects of regular worship and became the rulers of the powers of life, demons, or spirits, were subordinated to them. But inasmuch as they were still feared and occasionally worshiped by the populace, they became the objects of popular superstition. Continue reading

The Second Book of Baruch (2)

Baruch and JeremiahThe Second Book of Baruch

See part 1

Prayer of Baruch

48:1  And it happened after seven days that I prayed before YAHWEH the Mighty One and said:

48:2  O YAHWEH, YOU summon the coming of the times, and they stand before YOU. YOU cause the display of power of the worlds to pass away and they do not resist YOU. YOU arrange the course of Continue reading

The Second Book of Baruch (1)

Baruch and JeremiahThe Second Book of Baruch

 
Yerusalem will be destroyed

1:1 And it happened in the twenty-fifth year of YeconiYah (Jeconiah), the king of Yahudah, that the Word of YAHWEH came to Baruch, the son of Neriah,

1:2 And said to him: Have you seen all that this people are doing to ME, the evil things which the two tribes which remained have done more than the Continue reading

Dating the Book of Baruch

Jeremiah_by_RepinThe Book of Baruch
From Catholic Encyclopedia

(Hebrew Barûkh, blessed, Benedict; Septuagint Barouch).

The disciple of Jeremiah, and the traditional author of the deuto-canonical book, which bears his name. He was the son of Nerias (Jeremiah 32:12, 32:16; 36:4, 8, 32; Baruch 1:1), and most probably the brother of Saraias, chief chamberlain to King Sedecias (Jeremiah 32:12; 51:59; Baruch 1:1).

After the temple of Jerusalem had been plundered by Nebuchadnezzar (599 B.C.), he wrote under the dictation of Jeremiah the oracle of that great prophet, foretelling the return of the Babylonians, and read them at the risk of his life in the hearing of the Jewish people. He wrote also the Continue reading

First Book of Baruch

Baruch and Jeremiah The First Book of Baruch

1:1 And these are the words of the book, which Baruch the son of Nerias, the son of Maasias, the son of Sedecias, the son of Asadias, the son of Chelcias, wrote in Babylon,

1:2 In the fifth year, and in the seventh day of the month, what time as the Chaldeans took Jerusalem, and burnt it with fire.

1:3 And Baruch did read the words of this book in the hearing of Jechonias the son of Joachim king of Juda, and in the ears of all the people that came to hear the book, Continue reading