Tag Archives: Calendar

Bantu Calendar

ImageADAM’S CALENDAR AND THE HIDDEN RUINS OF SOUTHERN AFRICA
By Michael Tellinger

Scholars have told us that the first civilisation on Earth emerged in a land called Sumer some 6,000 years ago. Recent archaeological findings suggest that the Sumerians may have inherited some of their knowledge from an earlier civilisation that emerged many thousands of years earlier in southern Africa, the cradle of humankind. More than 100,000 years ago, early humans built a stone calendar that precedes all other man-made structures found to date. This discovery is so astounding that it requires a true paradigm shift in our approach to ancient human activity, as it takes us closer to the emergence of the earliest humans on planet Earth.

Ancient stone ruins and a sophisticated clifftop calendar found in southern Africa could be at least 100,000 years old and are evidence that this region was the cradle of humankind as well as home to the Continue reading

Seven Ten Two

72 Names - Linda Saskia MenczelProperties of the number 72
By Riding The Beast

Symbolism

  • Represents the number of the earth.
  • According to R. Allendy, it is “the differentiation, 2, in cosmic series, 70, producing the extreme multiplicity of the aspects, moreover interdependent between them (7 + 2 = 9)”. It would express also the solidarity in the multiplicity (8 x 9) showing the harmony and the reciprocity in universal relations of things.
  • The 72 Paranatellons, extra-zodiacal constellations that rise and set simultaneously with zodiacal constellations.

In religion Continue reading

Year of the Horse!

ferrebeekeeper

year-of-horse-zodiac_1389986758

Happy Chinese New Year! Last year was the reptilian year of the snake, but this year things get all mammalian again—and what a magnificent mammal! Lunar Year 4711 is the year of the horse!

Ferrebeekeeper has shied away from writing about horses because the majestic animals have played such an important role in military and economic history (also I don’t want a bunch of patricians shouting at me about the finer details of fetlocks and snaffle bits), but, since it is now the year of the horse, I would be remiss not to post some equine highlights from those 4711 years of Chinese culture. Horses were (probably) domesticated in next door Kazakhstan about five thousand years ago, and they have had an unparalleled position in Chinese culture.  Not only is Chinese mythology replete with horses, throughout the entire history of the Han people, the great perissodactyls have been pivotal…

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KMT Calendar – January

KMT Calendar

January

Rekehwer

1
Day of Hathor

Procession of Set and His Shemsu

Navigation of Ma’at

2
Day of Thoth

Monthly feast of Re

Feast of Horus

3
 
4
Feast of Isis

Feast of Sekhmet as the Eye of Ra

Raising the Djed Pillar for Wesir

5 Invocation and Offerings to the Akhu
Feast and Procession Nut

Monthly feast of Re

7
Feast of Lifting Up the Sky

Feast of the Great Burning Continue reading

KMT – Day Calendar

Month December

SATURN WORSHIP December–The Tenth Month

December had two names among the English Saxons: “Wintermonath” meaning winter month, and “Heligmonath” meaning “holy month”, as Christmas falls in this month.

The chief festival of this “tenth” and last month of the year was the Saturnalia, held on the seventeenth of the month in honour of Saturn, the father of Jupiter. [Charles I and II]

Saturn the Cronos, was one of the Titans, the six giant sons of Uranus (Heaven) and Gaia (Earth). Uranus ruled before the days of Man, but he was overthrown by his son Saturn, who became for a time the supreme ruler of the universe. Uranus prophesied that Saturn would one day himself be overthrown by his children, and in order to avoid this, Saturn, when his first child was born, immediately swallowed him! Continue reading

Month November

November–The Ninth Month

The English Saxons had two names for this month of November: “Windmonath” meaning “wind month”, and “Blodmonath” meaning “blood month”. The latter name arose from the fact that during this month they slaughtered large numbers of cattle to last them through the cold and dreary winter.

On the thirteenth of this “ninth” month a feast as held in honour of Jupiter, the ruler of the Anglo-men. From the clouded top of Mount Olympus he held sway. Terrible indeed was it to anger any of the gods, but no punishment was more swift and sure than that sent by Jupiter when he was enraged.

With his thunderbolt he slew the proud and reckless Phaeton, and we have another example in the story of Bellerophon, who was staying at the court of a king. He was set the task of killing the Chimaera, a monster with a lion’s head, a goat’s body, a dragon’s tail, and breath of fire. As Minerva learnt of his task she promised to help him, and, giving him a golden bridle, told him to bridle the horse Pegasus. Continue reading

Month October

October–The Eighth Month

The Saxon name for October was “Winter fylleth” meannig “winter full moon”. The winter was supposed to begin at the October full moon.

In this “eighth” month, a great festival was held at Eleusis, in honour of Ceres [Czares]. She was known as Demeter meaning “The Mother”. She was worshiped as the matron of Agriculture, since the fields and their crops were thought to be under her special care. The name Ceres has given us the word “cereals”, a general name for wheat, barley, rye, and oats.

Ceres had a daughter, Persephone, who spent a great part of her time wandering with her companions on the slopes and plains. One day, Pluto rode by in his chariot drawn by four black horses. Attracted by Persephone’s beauty, he determined to carry her off to Hades and make her his queen. Persephone was thus separated from her companions, and Pluto seizing Persephone, carried her off to his dark and gloomy home, the Underworld. Continue reading

Month September

Autumnal EquinoxSeptember–The Seventh Month

The name of this month means simply “seventh”, and so suggests to us neither god nor hero. The Saxon name for September was “Gerstmonath”, which means “barley month”, since during September the barley crop was usually harvested.

In England, there were several festivals held in the month, on the second of the month the Actian Games. On this day, mythical Julius Ceasar fought the battle of Actium in the Channel. As Augustus, he defeated Marcus Antonius Brutus and his wife Cleo-patra. The games in honour of Apollo, were held on each anniversary of the victory. These games lasted for five days, and consisted of foot-races, chariot-races, wrestling, throwing the quoit and the javelin. The winners were crowned with a wreath made from the laurel tree, the favourite tree of Apollo. Continue reading

Month August

The Month of Augustus

The month August was first called Sextilis – the sixth month. The Saxon name for August was Hlaf-maesse, meaning Loaf Mass, because during the month was held a feast of thanksgiving for the first fruits of the corn [wheat], August being the time when harvesting begins. The first day is sometimes called Lammas Day, lammas being a slightly altered form of the word hlaf-maesse.

The month Sextilis, was also renamed after Julius Caesar, as Augustus. Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus was the name given to Octavian [‘the eight’], the son of mythical Caesar. Julius supposedly fought and won many battles to become the head of the Anglos. He returned to close the temple of Janus [Iunus], proclaimed peace. During the mythical time set for his reign lived the greatest poets and writers of England, of whom the best known are Virgil, Horace, Ovid, and Livy. Continue reading

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