Tag Archives: Myth

Saving Bull (2)

Duomo di Monreale | Art and FaithHistory of the Devil
By Paul Carus, [1900]

THE IDEA OF SALVATION IN GREECE AND ITALY.

Part 1 Here

In the days of Augustus and his successors the people were taught to expect salvation, the dispensation of justice, protection, peace, and prosperity from the emperor; and just as we have to-day monarchies where the king regards himself as the Anointed One by the grace of God and a representative of God on earth, so the Roman emperor arrogated to himself divine honors, and even philosophers such as Seneca did not hesitate to acknowledge the claim. The practical significance of this view is that the government should be regarded with religious awe, and its officers, as such, are divine. The Christians who refused to worship before the emperor’s images must have appeared to the Romans of those days as anarchists and rebels. But when Nero committed matricide and other most outrageous crimes, the belief in the emperor’s divinity dwindled away, and the idea of the suffering God, the man who died on the cross because he would rather be than appear just, gained ground among the people.

Christianity was not the only religion which promised deliverance from evil through the saving power of blood and by means of a vicarious atonement, for we know of the immortality-promising mysteries, and especially of the cult of Mithras, which had embodied many ideas and ceremonies that are also met with in Christianity. Continue reading

Salve Tores

Art - Art And Art History 253 with Bent at Washington and Lee University - StudyBlueHistory of the Devil
By Paul Carus, [1900]

p. 193
THE IDEA OF SALVATION IN GREECE AND ITALY.

ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ ποηροῦ.
Matt. vi. 14.

THE first century of [this] era is a time in which the fear of evil leads to the organisation of religious institutions having in view the atonement of sin and the redemption of the soul from the terrors of hell.

The ideas evil, sin, hell, salvation, and immortal life were familiar to the Greek mind even before the days of Plato, but were still mixed up with the traditional mythology. When philosophers began to wage war against the gross idolatry of Greek polytheism, a fermentation set in which prepared the Greek nation for the reception of Christianity. We say “prepared,” but we might just as well say that it resulted in the formation of the Christian Church as an institution to deliver mankind from evil.

The fear of punishment in the life to come led in the days of savagery to human sacrifices as a vicarious atonement. This barbarous practice was abandoned in the progress of civilisation by a substitution of animal victims. But the idea lingered in the minds of the people and was retained in Christianity, where, Continue reading

Dominican Myths

Myths and Legends/ Mitos y Leyendas

Folclore de la República Dominicana/ Folklore of the Dominican Republic

Chupacabra/ Goat Sucker or Evil thingcould this be the chupacabra of legends?
The chupacabra is (supposedly) alien in origin and was brought here by a UFO. It is a living creature that looks like a hunched alien with a line of sharp spikes down the middle of it’s back exactly where the spine is located. It has gray skin that is part fur and part feathers. It has short arms ending with long nasty claws. Its legs are like a kangaroos.
The chupacabra is said to be about 4 feet tall when standing erect. This gray being has huge red elongated glowing eyes, the better to see you with. They are said to be very powerful and people have reported seeing the chupacabra fly.

Creatures fitting this description were said to be spotted first in Puerto Rico in the mid-1990s. Then, a few years later, the chupacabra started showing up in Mexico, South Florida, Central America, and South America including Dominican Republic. Although few people have actually claimed to seeing a real chupacabra many claim to have seen the works of this blood sucking alien being. Continue reading

Dominican Travel

firefly but I figured it belonged here also....: Fire Fly, Fireflies ...Legends of the Dominican Republic

By Robert Nickel, 2011 [Edited]

Although myths and legends are by definition largely untrue, each one of us has a little inkling in us that suspects there may be some truth to the story. Regardless of your assertion that you do not believe in such things, it is still fun to hear the mythical stories tied to a vacation destination. They give a great insight into the people and culture of the region, as well as offer an explanation on seemingly strange behavior you might encounter. Here are some of the most prevalent legends of the Dominican Republic.

Fireflies are fairly common in the Dominican, but are referred to as the Nimitas. The people believe Nimitas are the souls of the dead watching their loved ones. Their lights are a reminder for everyone that they are there and watching every move you make. Continue reading

Moor Eyes of Aisa

Moirai

In Greek mythology, the Moirai (Μοῖραι) (mɪrˌiː), often known in English as the Fates (Latin: Fatae), were the white-robed incarnations of destiny; their Roman equivalent was the Parcae (euphemistically the “sparing ones”). Their number became fixed at three:
– Clotho (spinner),
– Lachesis (allotter) and
– Atropos (unturnable) [also called Moira, Morta or Aisa].

The Moirai controlled the mother thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction. The gods and men had to submit to them, although Zeus’s relationship with them is a matter of debate.

Some sources say Zeus is the only one who can command them (the Zeus Moiragetes), yet others suggest he was also bound to the Moirai’s dictates. In the Homeric poems Moira or Aisa, is related with the limit and end of life, and Zeus appears as the guider of destiny. In the Theogony of Hesiod, the three Moirai are personified, and are acting over the gods. Later they are daughters of Zeus and Themis, who was the embodiment of divine order and law. Continue reading

Dionysus

Dionysus – Tyrant and Liberator
From Myth and More, 2013

Recently I was asked a question about Dionysus and what weaknesses this god had. In this post I will create a short profile of Dionysus and address fatal flaws or “Achilles’ heel” for this god.

The Story

While pregnant, Semele, the mother of Dionysus, falls to her death when she gazes upon the unprotected vision of the father of her child, Zeus. To allow the unborn child to continue to grow, Zeus places the child in his thigh secured with a golden clamp. When it was time for the child to be born, Zeus opens the clamp and gives birth to the infant Dionysus, the “twice-born.”

To protect him from the wrath of Hera, the wife of Zeus, Dionysus is raised by nymphs and dressed as a girl. In adolescence, Dionysus discovers wine, rejects his feminine disguise and is found by Hera. At this point, Dionysus goes mad. The myth is rather vague whether his madness is from Hera’s vengeance, the onset of adolescence, or the wine. But, whatever the cause, he wanders across Greece, Egypt, and Syria in his madness. Continue reading

Telete

TELETE

Greek Name Τελετη
Transliteration Teletê
Latin Spelling Telete
Translation Consecration, Initiation (teletê)

TELETE was the daimona (spirit) who presided over the initiation rites of the Bacchic orgies. She was a daughter of the god Dionysos.

PARENTS
DIONYSOS & NIKAIA (Nonnus Dionysiaca 16.392)

Pausanias, Description of Greece 9. 30. 1 (trans. Jones) (Greek travelogue C2nd A.D.) :
“[In the sanctuary of the Mousai (Muses) on Mt Helikon in Boiotia:] First [there are] images of the Mousai . . . by the side of Orpheus stands a statue of Telete, and around him are beasts of stone and bronze listening to his singing.”

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 16. 392 ff (trans. Rouse) (Greek epic C5th A.D.) : Continue reading

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