Tag Archives: Kaballah

Star In the Sky

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The Wedding of Astrology and Kabbalah: Stars and Spheres

The following is an excerpt from Cosmic Navigator by Gahl Sasson:

The author of Sefer Yetzirah —tradition suggests it was Abraham, the first mono- theist of the Old Testament—provides precise associations between the zodiac signs and the Hebrew letters, yoking astrology to the sacred letters of the Torah. This manuscript details how God deployed the archetypal energies of the ten-sphered Kabbalistic Tree of Life and the twenty-two Hebrew letters to create the universe (see chapter 5).

The Midrash, a collection of Jewish myths and legends, tells us that King Solomon wore a magical ring engraved with Hebrew letters that afforded him the power to speak with animals. Since the word zodiac in Greek means “the wheel of animals,” one can say that King Solomon’s capacity to converse with animals referred to his ability to speak the language of the Continue reading

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Tikkun Olam

Tikkun ha-Olam: The Restoration of the World
By Sanford Drob, 2001

The symbol of Tikkun ha-Olam embodies the most distinctively Jewish, as well as the the single most important ethical injunction of the Kabbalah: the command that humanity must restore and redeem a broken and fallen world (see Shevirat ha-Kelim). As articulated by Isaac Luria in 16th century Safed, Tikkun is a symbol with both metaphysical and theological implications. Luria and his disciples understood every event in the created universe, indeed the very act of creation itself to be an introduction and prelude to Tikkun ha-Olam. For them it is only as a result of the world’s restoration that both cosmos and God can be said to be complete.

A wide array of Kabbalistic symbols informs the Lurianic understanding of Tikkun ha-Olam. Each of these Continue reading

Jewish Weeping

Dream Techniques in Jewish Mysticism
From Jewish Mystical Realms

In many cultures, dreams have been conceived of as channels of communication with other, spiritual realms, and this is the case also of Jewish mysticism. On the one hand, divine emissaries were described as invading the human consciousness during dreams in order to announce important messages; on the other, someone could induce dreams by resorting to a variety of oneirogenic* techniques. We will bring here several examples of such techniques, out of an enormous body of literature, which demonstrate that Kabbalists were involved in various nocturnal forms of experiences, an aspect of Kabbalah which still awaits analysis by scholars.

One particularly neglected realm in the study of Kabbalah is a literary genre dealing with dream-recipes: the so-called she’elot halom, i.e. questions formulated before someone went to sleep, questions whose answers were expected to arrive in dreams. In many cases, these answers took the form of a biblical Continue reading

Three Trees at the Skull Gate

The Three Crosses of Golgotha
By Kim Graae Munch, 2008

The three crosses on Golgotha is a significant scene in the New Testament. It signifies the main powers in the development of the Earth, as described in the The Tree of Life from the Kabbalah.

When only the cross with Christ is shown, we see only a small part of the mystery, as the crucifixion contains a trinity.

As Rudolf Steiner is one of the primary Christian esoteric teachers I have taken the following texts from Christ and the Human Soul: Continue reading

Zohar – 8. Adrammelech

Adrammelech

Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Adrammelech
(splendor of the king)

The name of an idol introduced into Samaria by the colonists from Sepharvaim. (2 Kings 17:31) He was worshipped with rites resembling those of Molech, children being burnt in his honor.

Adrammelech was probably the male power of the sun, and ANAMMELECH, who is mentioned with Adrammelech as a companion god, the female power of the sun.

Son of the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who, with his brother Sharezer, murdered their father in the temple of Nisroch at Nineveh, after the failure of the Assyrian attack on Continue reading

Demons and the Seven Sins

Daemonary
From Liza Phoenix

The Seven Deadly Sins

Pride: Lucifer: A great angel cast into Hell; also known as the light bringer, the bearer of light, and the morning star; inspires pride and rebellion. From Latin Lucifer. bef.1000. (Islamic, Judeo-Christian, Satanic)

Sloth: Belphegor: Demon of indifference; inspires extreme laziness and spiritual apathy. From Hebrew Baal-Peor, Bel-Phegor. (Judeo-Christian)

Gluttony: Beelzebub: The prince of demons; the lord of the flies; inspires gluttony, unholy desire, jealousy, war, and murder. From Hebrew Ba’al-Z’bub, Ba’al-Z’bul. bef.1100. (Islamic, Judeo-Christian, Satanic) Continue reading

Dem Demons – 2

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Part 1

Pre-Talmudic Demonology.

Upon pre-Talmudic demonology new light has been thrown by the “Testament of Solomon,” translated by Conybeare in “Jew. Quart. Rev.” (1898, xi. 1-45), a work which, notwithstanding many Christian interpolations, is of ancient Jewish origin and related to the “Book of Healing” (“Sefer Refu’ot”) ascribed to King Solomon (see Pes. iv. 9; Josephus, l.c.; Schürer, “Geseh.” iii. 300). In this “Testament” it is told that by the help of a magic ring with the seal of Pentalpha, Lilith-like vampires, Beelzebub, and all kinds of demons and unclean spirits were brought before Solomon, to whom they disclosed their secrets and told how they could be mastered. It contains incantations against certain diseases, and specifies the task allotted to each of the chief demons in the erection of the Temple.

The latter was a favorite theme of the Haggadists (Pesiḳ. R. vi.; Soṭah 48b; Giṭ. 68a). The later Haggadah ascribed to Moses this power to Continue reading

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