Tag Archives: Kaballah

Jewish Weeping

Dream Techniques in Jewish Mysticism
From Jewish Mystical Realms

In many cultures, dreams have been conceived of as channels of communication with other, spiritual realms, and this is the case also of Jewish mysticism. On the one hand, divine emissaries were described as invading the human consciousness during dreams in order to announce important messages; on the other, someone could induce dreams by resorting to a variety of oneirogenic* techniques. We will bring here several examples of such techniques, out of an enormous body of literature, which demonstrate that Kabbalists were involved in various nocturnal forms of experiences, an aspect of Kabbalah which still awaits analysis by scholars.

One particularly neglected realm in the study of Kabbalah is a literary genre dealing with dream-recipes: the so-called she’elot halom, i.e. questions formulated before someone went to sleep, questions whose answers were expected to arrive in dreams. In many cases, these answers took the form of a biblical Continue reading

Three Trees at the Skull Gate

The Three Crosses of Golgotha
By Kim Graae Munch, 2008

The three crosses on Golgotha is a significant scene in the New Testament. It signifies the main powers in the development of the Earth, as described in the The Tree of Life from the Kabbalah.

When only the cross with Christ is shown, we see only a small part of the mystery, as the crucifixion contains a trinity.

As Rudolf Steiner is one of the primary Christian esoteric teachers I have taken the following texts from Christ and the Human Soul: Continue reading

Zohar – 8. Adrammelech

Adrammelech

Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Adrammelech
(splendor of the king)

The name of an idol introduced into Samaria by the colonists from Sepharvaim. (2 Kings 17:31) He was worshipped with rites resembling those of Molech, children being burnt in his honor.

Adrammelech was probably the male power of the sun, and ANAMMELECH, who is mentioned with Adrammelech as a companion god, the female power of the sun.

Son of the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who, with his brother Sharezer, murdered their father in the temple of Nisroch at Nineveh, after the failure of the Assyrian attack on Continue reading

Demons and the Seven Sins

Daemonary
From Liza Phoenix

The Seven Deadly Sins

Pride: Lucifer: A great angel cast into Hell; also known as the light bringer, the bearer of light, and the morning star; inspires pride and rebellion. From Latin Lucifer. bef.1000. (Islamic, Judeo-Christian, Satanic)

Sloth: Belphegor: Demon of indifference; inspires extreme laziness and spiritual apathy. From Hebrew Baal-Peor, Bel-Phegor. (Judeo-Christian)

Gluttony: Beelzebub: The prince of demons; the lord of the flies; inspires gluttony, unholy desire, jealousy, war, and murder. From Hebrew Ba’al-Z’bub, Ba’al-Z’bul. bef.1100. (Islamic, Judeo-Christian, Satanic) Continue reading

Dem Demons – 2

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Part 1

Pre-Talmudic Demonology.

Upon pre-Talmudic demonology new light has been thrown by the “Testament of Solomon,” translated by Conybeare in “Jew. Quart. Rev.” (1898, xi. 1-45), a work which, notwithstanding many Christian interpolations, is of ancient Jewish origin and related to the “Book of Healing” (“Sefer Refu’ot”) ascribed to King Solomon (see Pes. iv. 9; Josephus, l.c.; Schürer, “Geseh.” iii. 300). In this “Testament” it is told that by the help of a magic ring with the seal of Pentalpha, Lilith-like vampires, Beelzebub, and all kinds of demons and unclean spirits were brought before Solomon, to whom they disclosed their secrets and told how they could be mastered. It contains incantations against certain diseases, and specifies the task allotted to each of the chief demons in the erection of the Temple.

The latter was a favorite theme of the Haggadists (Pesiḳ. R. vi.; Soṭah 48b; Giṭ. 68a). The later Haggadah ascribed to Moses this power to Continue reading

Dem Demons – 1

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Systematic knowledge concerning demons or evil spirits. Demons (Greek, δαίμονες or δαιμόνια; Hebrew, [Deut. xxxii. 17; Ps. cvi. 37] and [Lev. xvii. 7; II Chron. xi. 15; A. V. “devils”; Luther, “Feldgeister” and “Feldteufel”]; Aramaic, or rabbinical, and as spirits animating all elements of life and inhabiting all parts of the world, have their place in the primitive belief of all tribes and races. When certain deities rose to be the objects of regular worship and became the rulers of the powers of life, demons, or spirits, were subordinated to them. But inasmuch as they were still feared and occasionally worshiped by the populace, they became the objects of popular superstition. Continue reading

AsmoDemus

Asmodeus

Asmodeus (Ασμοδαίος) or Ashmedai (אַשְמְדּאָי‎) is a lord of demons mostly known from the Book of Tobit, in which he is the primary antagonist. The demon is also mentioned in the story of the construction of the Temple of Solomon.

Asmodeus is supposed by some Christians to be the King of the Nine Hells or one of the seven princes of Hell. In Binsfeld’s classification of demons, each one of these princes represents one of the seven sins (Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Envy, and Pride). Asmodeus is the demon of lust and is therefore responsible for twisting people’s sexual desires.

It is said in Asmodeus; Or, The Devil on Two Sticks that people who fall to Asmodeus’ ways will be sentenced to an eternity in the second level of hell. Continue reading

Dark Son Azazel

Azazel wikiThe Case for Azazel being the Firstborn Seed of Lilith
By Mark Wayne Biggs
[Edited]

No study of Lilith would be complete without a discussion of the demon Azazel. This is true because several clues in many ancient texts – including the Torah, the Zohar, and the First Book of Enoch – indicate that Azazel was the seed of Lilith. The texts further hint that Azazel was not the product of Lilith mating with any ordinary man, but rather he was the firstborn seed resulting from her illicit mating with Semjaza, the leader of a group of fallen angels called Watchers. Continue reading

Many Many Lilith

Dore – The Destruction of Leviathan very much like the sword of Saint George destroying the selfish competitive Dragon-Serpent Ego

LILITH
The Scarlet Woman
From Energy Enhancement

See part 1

Samael and Lilith were born as one, emanating from beneath the Throne of God with a great tumult. This refers to the Kabbalistic belief that certain angels were created in male-female pairs. Lilith was also known as Taninsam, based on the name of the intermediary between her and her husband. This intermediary will eat deadly poison at the hands of the Gabriel; it is an elixir of life for all whose inclination overcomes them to become a black psychopath. Continue reading

Dark Lilibeth

Lilith Tempting Adam and Eve – Notre Dame Cathedral

The Case for Lilith
By Mark Wayne Biggs
[edited]

Of all the Jewish myths, the story of Lilith is undoubtedly the most fascinating. According to her legend Lilith was the first wife of Adam. But she was a failed mate who rebelled against her husband and fled from the garden to become the mother of demons. Her legend has influenced more modern monster mythologies than any other Jewish myth. Continue reading

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