Tag Archives: KMT

Kleopatra – the Key

cleopatraDefense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

See part 1 – Ptah Ra Pater

Cleopatra

Let us discuss Cleopatra, the feminine aspect of this subject matter. We talked about the Father but what about the Mother? You find this marvelous archetype also in ancient Egypt. When people talk about Cleopatra, they always remember the Cleopatra who was with Mark Anthony, but they ignore that there were many Cleopatra long before her in ancient Egypt. A Cleopatra is a vestal of the temple. They are what we call in this day in age “nuns.”

Cleopatra derives from the Greek name Κλεοπατρα, Κλεος-Πτα (Kleopatra) which means “glory of Ptah, the father” derived from (κλεος – kleos) “glory.” This is combined with πατρος, patros, “of the father (Πτα – Ptah)” or Κλεος-Ποτήρ “glory of the cup” (ποτήρ – potēr). The cup, the yoni, the feminine sexual organ, is the Holy Grail. Thus, Kleo-poter is Cleopatra.  Potēr means cup, chalice, grail, the sexual yoni. When you say Cleopatra, you are indicating the feminine sexual force of God. This is why the Cleopatras were vestals in ancient Egypt.

  • Kleopatra: “keys to the father,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + patros [πατρος] father
  • Kleopatra, Kleopetra: “Keystone,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + petra [πέτρᾳ] “stone”

Thus, Kleopatra symbolizes the keystone, which in the previous lecture the speaker was explaining. The keystone of the temple, the cornerstone of th Continue reading

Ptah Ra Pater

ptah

Defense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

The graphic is of the African symbol Ptah, which as an archetype was very active in ancient KMT (now Egypt). We find Ptah in the Bible as Tso-Phtah Paneach צפתה פענח [Genesis 41:45]. Thus, we are also going to explain what Ptah symbolizes. That is why at the bottom of this powerful symbol or archetype we wrote the quotation of Hosea chapter 11, verse 1.

All of the prayers and wisdom that we find in Christianity, Islam and Judaism, emerge from the same land: KMT. When we study the African archetypes, which are very profound, Gnostics do not fall into the mistake of thinking like the ignoramuses who think that these are “idols.” We know what idols are, and what archetypes are.

The Prayer of the Lord, called in Latin “Pater Noster,” is powerful when we recite it in Latin, given the fact that Latin is a Romanic root language of different romance languages, such as Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese. We also find Latin words in the English language. Continue reading

KMT PI

Related imageSacred Geometry in Ancient Egypt
By M. Gadalla

The Cosmic Geometry
Herodotus, the father of history and a native Greek, stated in 500 BCE:

Now, let me talk more of Egypt for it has a lot of admirable things and what one sees there is superior to any other country.

The Ancient Egyptian works, large or small, are admired by all, because they are proportionally harmonious and as such appeal to our inner as well as outer feelings. This harmonic design concept is popularly known as sacred geometry—where all figures could be drawn or created using a straight line (not even necessarily a ruler) and compass, i.e. without measurement (dependent on proportion only).

The principles of sacred geometry are of Ancient Egyptian origin, which constituted the basis of harmonic proportions, as evident in their temples, buildings, theology, …etc. The Ancient Egyptian design followed these principles in well-detailed canons. Plato himself attested to the longevity of the Egyptian harmonic canon of proportion (sacred geometry), when he stated, “the pictures and statues made ten thousand years ago…”

The key to divine harmonic proportion (sacred geometry) is the relationship between progression of Continue reading

Eternal Curse for the Thiever

An Eternal Curse upon the Reader of These Lines
Robert K. Ritner, 2003

In retribution for the ‘prying’ or ‘intrusive curiosity’ inherent in the reading of another’s words, the Argentine novelist Manuel Puig entitled a 1980 work ‘Eternal Curse on the Reader of these Pages.’ The same sentiment appears in Egyptian magic. A Coptic curse preserved in the British Museum (Oriental Ms. 5986) begins with an invocation for divine wrath directed not against its primary victims (who are later damned by name), but against the accidental discoverer:

God of heaven and earth! Whoever shall open this papyrus and read what is written in (it), may all those things written in it descend upon him.1

A counterpart is provided by the Coptic Papyrus Lichaev, which concludes a specific curse with a similar generic warning:

Whoever opens this papyrus and reads it, what is written on it will come upon him, by order of the lord god.2

Such invocations of divine hostility have their origin well before Coptic Christianity, in magical practices of Late Period Egypt that exploit the bond between the demonic and the divine. Continue reading

NebtHet (Nephthys)

Nephthys – Musée du Louvre, Paris, France

Nephthys

Nephthys (NebtHet) is a member of the Great Ennead of Heliopolis in Egyptian mythology, a daughter of Nut and Geb. At the time of the Fifth Dynasty Pyramid Texts, Nephthys appears as a goddess of the Heliopolitan Ennead. She is the sister of Isis and companion of the war-like deity, Set. As sister of Isis and especially Osiris, Nephthys is a protective goddess who symbolizes the death experience, just as Isis represented the (re-)birth experience.

Nephthys is a Greek epithet, transliterated as Nebet-het, and Nebt-het, from Egyptian hieroglyphs. The literal translation of her name is usually given as “Lady of the House,” which has caused some to mistakenly identify her with the notion of a “housewife,” or as the primary lady who ruled a domestic household. This is a pervasive error repeated in many commentaries concerning this deity. Her name means quite specifically, “Lady of the [Temple] Enclosure” which associates her with the role of priestess. Continue reading

Djed Symbol

Two ivory Djed pillars found in a
First Dynasty tomb at Helwan.
(photograph taken by J.D.Degreef)

The Concept of the Djed Symbol
By Vincent Brown, 2012

One of the most enigmatic symbols of Ancient Egypt is the Tet, or  Djed. Although it was widely used as a religious icon throughout much of the history and geography of Ancient Egypt, it is still not clearly understood what the Djed was originally conceived to represent. Determining its meaning from its appearance alone is not an easy task so we shall take some of the suggested definitions and analyse each individually. But first of all lets look at the key elements that make up the symbol.

Typical Distinctive Features:

  • Four horizontal bars surmounting a vertical shaft
  • Vertical striations between each bar
  • These striations are shown in profile on the sides of the Djed creating a curved appearance
  • Four bands around neck of the shaft
  • Sometimes a small capital can be seen surmounting the Djed
  • The Djed often stands on a rectangular base

Continue reading

Djed Pillar

The Djed-pillar
From Reshafim

The Djed-pillar, Egyptian Dd ,[1] is an ancient symbol for stability and endurance. It is mentioned in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom:

You shall emerge as Horus-of-the-Underworld at the head of those who never set and sit on your metal throne above the your canal belonging to the watery region (of the heavens), living like an ankh-beetle, enduring like a djed-pillar.

Pyramid Texts of Pepi I, PT 537 [2]

    The djed‘s magic could enhance endurance and stability of persons, institutions like the kingship, and of physical structures. One assumes that the djed-signs engraved on columns were hoped to improve the stability of the building.[3] Continue reading