Tag Archives: Religion

Confusing Anubis (Anpu)

Image result for tehutiGreek Story of Anpu

Nephthys gave birth to a son called Anpu, or Anubis, and that his father was, according to some, Set; from another point of view he was the son of Ra.

[He] was the jackal god, and he was associated with the dead because the jackal was generally seen prowling about the tombs. His worship is very ancient, and there is no doubt that even the earliest times his cult was general in Egypt; it is probable that it is older than that of Osiris.

In the text of Unas {line 70 he is associated with the Eye of Horus, and his duty as the guide of the dead in the Underworld on their way to Osiris was well defined, even at the remote period when this composition was written, from we read, Unas standeth with the Spirits, get thee onwards, Anubis, into “Amenti {the Underworld, onwards, onwards to Osiris.”

In the lines that follow we see that Anubis is mentioned in connection with Horus, Set, [Tehuti], Sep, and Khent-an-maati. From another passage of the same text we find {line 207 ff that the hand, arms, belly, and legs of the deceased are identified with Temu, but his face is said to be in the form of that of Anubis. The localities in which Anubis was especially worshipped are Abt, the Papyrus Swamps, Sep, Re-au, Heru-ti, Ta-hetchet, Saint, {Lycopolis, Sekhem, {Letopolis, etc. Continue reading

Star In the Sky

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The Wedding of Astrology and Kabbalah: Stars and Spheres

The following is an excerpt from Cosmic Navigator by Gahl Sasson:

The author of Sefer Yetzirah —tradition suggests it was Abraham, the first mono- theist of the Old Testament—provides precise associations between the zodiac signs and the Hebrew letters, yoking astrology to the sacred letters of the Torah. This manuscript details how God deployed the archetypal energies of the ten-sphered Kabbalistic Tree of Life and the twenty-two Hebrew letters to create the universe (see chapter 5).

The Midrash, a collection of Jewish myths and legends, tells us that King Solomon wore a magical ring engraved with Hebrew letters that afforded him the power to speak with animals. Since the word zodiac in Greek means “the wheel of animals,” one can say that King Solomon’s capacity to converse with animals referred to his ability to speak the language of the Continue reading

Holy Khet

Image result for sephedet

Sphinx Nose Shot Off for Pinterest Continue reading

Heru and A Kat

Copyright (c) 2001 - Andrew Bayuk, All Rights ReservedGuardian’s Shinx
Guardian of the Horizon

By Andrew Bayuk

The Sphinx of Giza [Her-em-Akhet] is a symbol that has represented the essence of Egypt for thousands of years. Even with all of the pictures that we see of the Sphinx, nothing can really prepare you for the time that you finally see the Sphinx with your own eyes. Here’s a look at the Sphinx that will give you a hint of what you can expect to see if you visit Egypt.

Carved from the bedrock of the Giza plateau, the Sphinx is truly a mysterious marvel from the days of ancient Egypt. The body of a lion with the head of a king or god, the sphinx has come to symbolize strength and wisdom. Continue reading

Guarding Heru

Related imageHer-em-Akhet

From World Afropedia (Edited)

Heru-em-Akhut (Her-em-Akhet) is a Khemetan term that roughly translates to Heru in the Horizon. It is a Monument which depicts the head of an Afu-Ra-Kan [Afrikan] atop the body of a lion, known today as the ‘Great Sphinx of Giza’. Heru-em-Akhut was later used as the model for the hellenic “Harmakhus”.

Physical Description and Controversy

Throughout history, people have been perplexed by the majestic presence of Heru-em-Akhut. At over 66-feet high, 20-feet wide and 241-feet long, Heru-em-Akhut stands as the largest monolithic structure in the world. Its dimensions are as massive as its builders’ achievement–an achievement so great that, when later witnessed by european explorers, they concluded that a reality of it being built by Humans could not be possible.

Though it protected the horizon in Khemt, and was decorated wall-to-wall with Netjer Medu, european “scholars” have searched vigorously for its builders in some “ancient lost civilization”, or “proofs” to lend its fashioning to extraterrestrial ‘super-beings’. Continue reading

Fuad in Islam

The Heart: Fu’aad, Qalb and Sadr
By Amatullah [based on notes of Nouman’s lecture], 2009

In the Qur’an, [there are] three words to describe our hearts: qalb, fuad and sadr. We know that every Arabic word is chosen for a reason, yet all three of these words for the most part are translated as “heart.” As usual, the intricate meanings of these words are not captured in the translation.

So, what is their difference?

Qalb

Qalb is the general word for heart. It comes from the root which means something that turns around and about and upside down. It is the nature of hearts that they are constantly changing, this is the normal state of our hearts. When ta’ala refers to eman and diseases of the heart, qalb is used.

Fu’ad

Fu’ad is from the verb fa’ada meaning burning or a flame. Continue reading

Book of Silence

Walking on Water (WoW!): Considering the Subject of SilenceFrom Book of Silence – Sepher Hash’tikah
by Reb Yakov Leib HaKohain, DONMEH WEST

 

“In seeking Wisdom, the first stage is silence.” — Rabbi Solomon ibn Gabriol (11th Century)

To begin with, there are two Silences and not one: There is the Silence of the Mouth and, in addition, the Silence of the Mind. The former does not necessarily accompany the latter, but the latter always accompanies the former. That is, one can be silent “in-the-mouth” while not, at the same time, also being silent “in-the-mind.” On the other hand, one who is silent “in-the-mind” is, at the same time, always silent in-the-mouth. Thus, there are three types of Lomaidim (Hebrew = “Learners”):

  • THE FOOL: Silent neither in the Mouth nor Mind
  • THE HEARING IMPAIRED: Silent in the Mouth but not the Mind
  • THE LISTENER: Silent in the Mouth and the Mind

Of the “fool,” Buddhism says, “A fool is like a spoon: it can sit in a bowl of soup forever and never taste it.” And in much the same way, the Talmud teaches: Continue reading