Tag Archives: India

Hindi Alphabet

Hindi Alphabet
From Linguanaut

Devanagari is an abugida alphabet of India and Nepal. It is written from left to right, lacks distinct letter cases, and is recognizable by a distinctive horizontal line running along the tops of the letters that links them together. Devanagari is the main script used to write Hindi, Marathi, and Nepali. Since the 19th century, it has been the most commonly-used script for Sanskrit and Pali.

Devanāgarī is also employed for Gujari, Bhili, Bhojpuri, Konkani, Magahi, Maithili, Marwari, Newari, Pahari (Garhwali and Kumaoni), Santhali, Tharu, and sometimes Sindhi, Panjabi, and Kashmiri. It Continue reading

Fisher Kings

Fisher Kings
By Kathy Doore

Viracocha – Quetzalcoatl Enki – Vishnu – Oannes

At the dawn of the present time cycle just after the great flood of Noah, recalled in the Bible and elsewhere, a mysterious group of god men appeared at various locations around the planet to initiate the survivors of the cataclysm in the rudiments of civilization. Legends from Peru to Sumeria, ancient Egypt to India, recount the arrival of god-like beings appearing after the great flood. Osiris and The Egyptian Thoth, India’s Vishnu, Enki and Oannes of Sumerian and Babylonia, Quetzalcoatl and Viracocha in the Americas, are remembered in ancient worldwide legends as a group of beings collectively referred to as the Fisher Kings — fisher’s of men.

Viracocha Continue reading

On Shingon

Acalanatha, the wrathful manifestation of Mahavairocana, and the principal deity invoked during the goma ritual.

Shingon Buddhism

Shingon Buddhism (真言宗 Shingon-shū) is one of the mainstream major schools of Buddhism in Japan and one of the few surviving Vajrayana lineages in East Asia, originally spread from India to China through traveling monks such as Vajrabodhi and Amoghavajra. Known in Chinese as the Tangmi, these Esoteric teachings would later flourish in Japan under the auspices of a Buddhist monk named Kūkai (空海), who traveled to Tang China to acquire and request transmission of the esoteric teachings. For that reason, it is often called Japanese Esoteric Buddhism, or Orthodox Esoteric Buddhism.

The word “Shingon” is the Japanese reading of Chinese: 真言 Zhēnyán “True Words”, which in turn is the Chinese translation of the Sanskrit word “mantra” (मन्त्र). Continue reading

Nagas

The Nagas
From Khandro Website

The word Naga comes from the Sanskrit, and nag is still the word for snake, especially the cobra, in most of the languages of India.

When we come upon the word in Buddhist writings, it is not always clear whether the term refers to a cobra, an elephant (perhaps this usage relates to its snake-like trunk, or the pachyderm’s association with forest-dwelling peoples of north-eastern India called Nagas), or even a mysterious person of nobility.

It is a term used for unseen beings associated with water and fluid energy, and also with persons having powerful animal-like qualities or conversely, an impressive animal with human qualities. Continue reading

Rahu and Ketu

Rahu & Ketu
By C. Hartley, 1997

According to the Sanskrit epic poem, the Mahabharata, the Hindu gods decided to mix up a batch of soma, the elixir of immortality. The gods were to drink the elixir to become immortal. The gods needed help from the demons to stir up the oceans to produce the elixir.

Out of the churning oceans the Sun, Moon, many goddess, and magic things were produced along with the soma. Vishnu took charge of distributing the freshly made soma to the gods but while it was being passed out the demons started battling with the gods for a taste of the elixir and in the confusion one of the demons, Rahu, disguised himself as a god and drank some of the elixir. Continue reading

Kali

Kali the Goddess: Gentle Mother, Fierce Warrior
By Madhuri Guin

O Kali, my mother full of bliss! Enchantress of the almighty Shiva!
In Thy delirious joy Thou dancest, clapping Thy hands together!
Thou art the Mover of all that move, and we are but Thy helpless toys.
— Ramakrishna Paramhans

Kali is one of the most well known and worshipped Hindu Goddesses. The name Kali is derived from the Hindu word that means “time”, and that also means “black”.

Kali in Hinduism, is a manifestation of the Divine Mother, which represents the female principle. Frequently, those not comprehending her many roles in life call Kali the goddess of destruction. She destroys only to recreate, and what she destroys is sin, ignorance and decay. She is equated with the eternal night, is the transcendent power of time, and is the consort of the god Shiva. Continue reading

Green and White Stars

Tara: Buddhist Goddess in Green and White
From Religion Facts

What is Tara?

Tara (Sanskrit, “star”) is a Buddhist savior-goddess especially popular in Tibet, Nepal and Mongolia. In Tibet, where Tara is the most important deity, her name is Sgrol-ma, meaning “she who saves.” The mantra of Tara (om tare tuttare ture svaha) is the second most common mantra heard in Tibet, after the mantra of Chenrezi (om mani padme hum).

The goddess of universal compassion, Tara represents virtuous and enlightened action. It is said that her compassion for living beings is stronger than a mother’s love for her children. She also brings about longevity, protects earthly travel, and guards her followers on their spiritual journey to enlightenment. Continue reading