Tag Archives: Asia

Kuan Yin Oracle

The Oracle of Kwan Yin
From Judika Illles [Edited]

The root of ‘divination’ is in the divine. Once upon a time, in the ancient world, it was not unusual to find divinatory services offered at temples and shrines. In other words, to put it plainly, you could expect to find some sort of fortune-teller within those sacred premises. Many journeyed to shrines to pay tribute to the resident sacred being, but also to receive advice and have their fortunes told. Oracles provide the voice of the divine.

Kwan Yin (Kuan Yin, Quan Yin, Quan Am, and Kannon) ranks among the most beloved of all sacred beings. Depending on perspective, she may be considered a goddess, a bodhisattva, a saint, or any combination of those categories. Some perceive Kwan Yin to be the Shekhina.

Adored by Buddhists, Taoists, goddess devotees, shrines and temples dedicated to Kwan Yin are found throughout East Asia and wherever Chinese people have traveled or settled. Continue reading

Kuan Yin

About Kwan Yin

Known as The Goddess of Mercy, Gentle Protector, Bodhisattva of Compassion, even the savior of seamen and fishermen, she holds many titles.

The spelling of her name varies – Kwan Yin, Kuan Yin, Quan Yin, Guanshiyin, Guanyin, Kwannon, Gwun Yam, Gun Yam, Kannon and more – but it is not so much the arrangement of letters as it is the effect that her spoken name produces on those with a Buddhist background, similar to a reaction in the West when one is speaking of the Virgin Mary. In both cases, it invokes the feeling of compassion and unconditional love. Indeed, her force is compared to Mother Mary in the West, Green Tara in the Tibetan culture, the Virgin of Guadeloupe in Mexico, and many other ancient goddesses, the matriarchy of old. You might call her the Buddhist Madonna, or, as She calls Herself, “The Mother of all Buddhas”.

By her own words, she is a complex energy presence. Thus, when asked her about her incarnations as “Kwan Yin,” this involves many persons that have embodied and reflected this energy in their lives on earth, as far as we can understand. According to Sucheta’s channelings, the closest association of Kwan Yin being linked to a person energetically in recent times is Miao Shan, an ancient Chinese princess who was known for her great compassion. Here is a quote from Kwan Yin about this: Continue reading

Goddess Tara

Tara Bronze CrystalinksGoddess of Compassion – One Who Saves
By Crystalinks.com

Diamonds are Her Sacred Stone.

Tara or Arya Tara, also known as Jetsun Dolma, is a female Bodhisattva typically associated with Tibetan Buddhism. She is the “mother of liberation”, and represents the virtues of success in work and achievements.

Tara is actually the generic name for a set of Bodhisattvas of similar aspect. These may more properly be understood as different aspects of the same quality, as Bodhisattvas are often considered metaphoric for Buddhist virtues. As Mahatara, Great Tara, she is the supreme creatrix and mother of all the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas.

Tara is the Feminine Goddess Archetype in Hindu Mythology. Tara governs the Underworld, the Earth and the Heavens, birth, death and regeneration, love and war, the seasons, all that lives and grows, the Moon cycles – Luna – feminine – creation.

Her animals are the sow, mare, owl and raven.

She is the most popular figure in the Tibetan pantheon of deities, the beautiful goddess Tara, (pronounced tah’ rah) whose name in means ‘Star’ – originated in Indian Hinduism as the Continue reading

Eruption of Krakatao

Krakatoa eruption lithograph.jpg1883 Eruption of Krakatoa

The 1883 eruption of Krakatoa in the Dutch East Indies (now Indonesia) began in the afternoon of August 26, 1883, and culminated with several destructive eruptions of the remaining caldera. On August 27, two-thirds of Krakatoa collapsed in a chain of titanic explosions, destroying most of the island and its surrounding archipelago.

It was one of the deadliest and most destructive volcanic events in recorded history, with at least 36,417 deaths being attributed to the eruption itself and the tsunamis it created. Significant additional effects were also felt around the world.

Early phase

In the years before the 1883 eruption, seismic activity around the volcano was intense, with earthquakes felt as far away as Australia. Beginning 20 May 1883, steam venting began to occur regularly from Perboewatan, the northernmost of the island’s three cones. Continue reading

American Senoi Theory

Senoi, Kilton Stewart and The Mystique of Dreams:
Further Thoughts on an Allegory About an Allegory
by G. WILLIAM DOMHOFF
From Spiritwatch

“Senoi” dream theory, which is centered around the idea that we should share and control our dreams for spiritual development, is an attractive theory said to derive from an appealing, non-violent people living simply in the highlands of Malaysia. But the real story of “Senoi” dream theory can be a painful one for at least two reasons that go beyond the usual academic conflicts over the validity and usefulness of ideas. First, some people in the United States and elsewhere make their living off of it by leading dream groups; they therefore have more at stake than do professors who are secure in their jobs whether their ideas pan out or not. Second, the theory resonates with deeply held cultural and spiritual values that almost compel people to believe it; they therefore become very upset when it is questioned. Continue reading

Senoi Dreams

The Selling of the Senoi
By ANN FARADAY and JOHN WREN-LEWIS
From Spiritwatch

It has been said that when religions are faced with new discoveries challenging their authority, they react in three predictable stages: first, “It’s not true”; second, “It’s wicked”; and third, “We knew it all along so why make a fuss about it?” A remarkably similar process is currently taking place amongst True Believers in the religion of so-called “Senoi dream control.”

Their first protest, when reports began to appear in the late 1970s denying that the Senoi tribe of Malaysia really practice dream manipulation, was to accuse the “militaristic Malaysian government” of suppressing both the gentle aborigines and their secret of non-violence. It was even seriously suggested that all visitors, including professional researchers, were ushered into jungle “concentration camps” where brainwashed Temiar, speaking through government interpreters, denied all knowledge of a dream control culture. Great care was taken, so the story went, to see that outsiders never penetrated to the hidden remnant of Temiar/Senoi who had escaped from government surveillance to keep their traditions alive in the jungle depths. Continue reading

Ling Chi Ching

Ling qi Jing

Lingqijing (or Ling Ch’i Ching; 靈棋經 lit. “Classic of the Divine Chess”) is a Chinese book of divination. The first commented edition of the work appeared in the Jin Dynasty. Legend has it that the strategist Zhang Liang got it from Huang Shigong, a semi-mythological figure in Chinese history.

As the name of the work suggests, the work tells of how to divine with tokens like Chinese chess or xiangqi (象棋) pieces, instead of the traditional turtle shells or yarrow stalks [or coins] used in I Ching.

Twelve chess pieces are used; each is a disc with a character on one side, and unmarked on the other. Four have the character for “up” (上, pronounced shang), four have the character for “middle” (中, zhong), and four have the character for “down” (下, xia), representing the Three Realms: Heaven (天, tian), Humanity (人, ren), and Continue reading