Tag Archives: Astronomy

Gates of Even

THE PORTALS OF HEAVEN
THE GOLDEN AND SILVER GATES
A Study of their Cosmic and Prophetic Significance
by Luis B. Vega, 2015

‘And to the Angel of the church in Philadelphia write: He who is Holy, who is True, who has the Key of David, who opens and no one will shut, and who shuts and no one opens, says this: ‘I know your deeds. Behold, I have put before you an Open Door [Gate] which no one can shut, because you have a little power, and have kept My word, and have not denied My name.’ – Revelation 3:7-8

The purpose of this study is to consider the concepts of the Golden and Silver Gates of the Cosmos. In light of the many assertions pertaining to the opening of ‘Gates’ or doors by CERN lately one has to appreciate the conceptualization of what the Golden Gate and Silver Gate alludes to. The Ancients knew that Gates or portals existed into other dimensions. One such knowledge is the concept of what the Golden Gate and Silver Gate are apparently in relation to the known Universe from Earth’s perspective. Continue reading

Dead Zone Disk

Dynamics of Protoplanetary Disks
By Philip J. Armitage, 2011

1. INTRODUCTION
Protoplanetary disks are the observational manifestation of the initial conditions for planet formation. They can be defined as rotationally supported structures of gas (invariably containing dust) that surround young, normally pre-main-sequence stars. Although most observed disks have inferred masses that are a small fraction of the stellar mass, no meaningful distinction can be drawn between physical processes in protoplanetary disks and those that occur in the earlier, protostellar phase, in which both star and disk are accreting rapidly. Similarly, a common set of processes operate, albeit to varying degrees, in disks around brown dwarfs, Classical T Tauri stars (low-mass pre-main-sequence stars that are actively accreting), and massive stars. A clear demarcation does separate protoplanetary disks from debris disks: dusty gas-poor structures around older stars whose properties reflect the collisional evolution of a population of small bodies (Wyatt, 2008).

Around low-mass stars, protoplanetary disks are persistent; the typical lifetime of ∼106 years (Haisch, Continue reading

S-Pacific Solar Eclipse

SE2016Mar09TSupermoon total solar eclipse March 8-9
From EarthSky, 2016

The moon turns new on March 8 or 9, 2016, depending on your time zone. The new moon happens one day before the moon reaches lunar perigee – the moon’s closest point to Earth in its orbit. Thus this new moon counts as a supermoon. It won’t be visible in our sky, but it’ll line up with the sun to create a larger-than-average effect on Earth’s oceans. Plus this new supermoon swings right in front of the sun, so if you’re at the right place on Earth, you might be able to view the new moon silhouette in front of the sun (but remember to use proper eye protection).

Who will see the March 8-9 eclipse?

Who will see the March 8-9 eclipse? Note on the worldwide map above that the path of totality (in dark blue) passes mainly over the waters of the Pacific Ocean. Only those along that long yet narrow path can see the total eclipse of the sun. The path of totality starts at sunrise in the Indian Ocean to the west of Indonesia, and then goes eastward across the Indian and Pacific Oceans until it ends to the west of North America at sunset. Continue reading

FU Ori of Orion

FU Orionis
All in the FUor Family
From AAVSO

FU Orionis resides near the imaginary shoulder of the great hunter constellation of Orion, at a location of about 3 degrees NW of Betelgeuse, and less than a degree east of the small planetary nebula NGC 2022. Although FU Ori can now be seen fluttering around 9th magnitude, its appearance hasn’t always been so brilliant. FU Ori’s rise to fame began in 1937 when the star appeared from relative obscurity at 16th magnitude and brightened by a factor of over 100 in 100-200 days. Accompanying the phantom star was a bright nebulosity, which glowed as a reflection of light from the luminous star. After increasing by 6 magnitudes in a period of a year, FU Ori continued to linger around maximum magnitude, where it has resided in a high state along with its ghostly nebula association ever since.

Since only one eruptive episode had been detected and because nothing was known of its pre-outburst state, the 1937 uprising of FU Ori was first thought to be a nova event. Although spectroscopic evidence suggested otherwise, interest in FU Ori and its nature seemed to wane with time. Continue reading

NGC 1333: Stellar Nursery in Perseus

TonyJCronin

NGC 1333 is seen in visible light as a reflection nebula, dominated by bluish hues characteristic of starlight reflected by interstellar dust. A mere 1,000 light-years distant toward the heroic constellation Perseus, it lies at the edge of a large, star-forming molecular cloud. This striking close-up spans about two full moons on the sky or just over 15 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 1333. It shows details of the dusty region along with hints of contrasting red emission from Herbig-Haro objects, jets and shocked glowing gas emanating from recently formed stars. In fact, NGC 1333 contains hundreds of stars less than a million years old, most still hidden from optical telescopes by the pervasive stardust. The chaotic environment may be similar to one in which our own Sun formed over 4.5 billion years ago. via NASA http://ift.tt/1Ppv2vc

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To 88 Modern Constellations

Constellation History

The study of celestial objects is an ancient one. Knowledge of the sun, moon, and stars, and their associated mythology, was passed from generation to generation but few conclusive records of prehistoric observations survive.

Constellations were part of the historical record in Mesopotamian culture around 4000 B.C. In the 8th century B.C. Homer mentioned a few now familiar constellations in his epic poem, the Odyssey. Four hundred years later Eudoxus of Cnidus wrote about 43 constellations (or 45 or 48 depending on one’s interpretation) which survive today. Eudoxus’ original work was lost but his ideas were kept alive by Aratus in a poem called Phaenomena (circa 270 B.C.). Continue reading

48 and 88 Constellations

almagestperseus.jpgPtolemy’s Almagest
First printed edition, 1515
By Ian Ridpath

HERE is a page of the star catalogue from the first printed edition of Ptolemy’s Almagest, published in Venice in 1515. It is based on the Latin translation made by Gerard of Cremona (c.1114–1187) in Toledo, Spain, in 1175. Gerard worked from Arabic manuscripts, which were themselves translations of the Greek original.

Ptolemy’s original manuscript is thought to have been produced around AD 150 and was long lost by Gerard’s time, a thousand years later, although copies survived, both in Greek and in Arabic. Continue reading