Tag Archives: Gods

Kleo Patra – the Key

cleopatraDefense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

See part 1 – Ptah Ra Pater

Cleopatra

Let us discuss Cleopatra, the feminine aspect of this subject matter. We talked about the Father but what about the Mother? You find this marvelous archetype also in ancient Egypt. When people talk about Cleopatra, they always remember the Cleopatra who was with Mark Anthony, but they ignore that there were many Cleopatra long before her in ancient Egypt. A Cleopatra is a vestal of the temple. They are what we call in this day in age “nuns.”

Cleopatra derives from the Greek name Κλεοπατρα, Κλεος-Πτα (Kleopatra) which means “glory of Ptah, the father” derived from (κλεος – kleos) “glory.” This is combined with πατρος, patros, “of the father (Πτα – Ptah)” or Κλεος-Ποτήρ “glory of the cup” (ποτήρ – potēr). The cup, the yoni, the feminine sexual organ, is the Holy Grail. Thus, Kleo-poter is Cleopatra.  Potēr means cup, chalice, grail, the sexual yoni. When you say Cleopatra, you are indicating the feminine sexual force of God. This is why the Cleopatras were vestals in ancient Egypt.

  • Kleopatra: “keys to the father,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + patros [πατρος] father
  • Kleopatra, Kleopetra: “Keystone,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + petra [πέτρᾳ] “stone”

Thus, Kleopatra symbolizes the keystone, which in the previous lecture the speaker was explaining. The keystone of the temple, the cornerstone of th Continue reading

Ptah Ra Pater

ptahDefense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

The graphic is of the African symbol Ptah, which as an archetype was very active in ancient KMT (now Egypt). We find Ptah in the Bible as Tso-Phtah Paneach צפתה פענח [Genesis 41:45]. Thus, we are also going to explain what Ptah symbolizes. That is why at the bottom of this powerful symbol or archetype we wrote the quotation of Hosea chapter 11, verse 1.

All of the prayers and wisdom that we find in Christianity, Islam and Judaism, emerge from the same land: KMT. When we study the African archetypes, which are very profound, Gnostics do not fall into the mistake of thinking like the ignoramuses who think that these are “idols.” We know what idols are, and what archetypes are.

The Prayer of the Lord, called in Latin “Pater Noster,” is powerful when we recite it in Latin, given the fact that Latin is a Romanic root language of different romance languages, such as Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese. We also find Latin words in the English language. Continue reading

Orante and the Jesus Goddess

From THE ORANTE AND THE GODDESS IN THE ROMAN CATACOMBS
Valerie Abrahamsen

Introduction
The Orante or Orans, generally a female figure with open eyes and upraised hands, is a pervasive symbol in early Christian art, perhaps “the most important symbol in early Christian art.”1 Found frequently in the late second-century art in the Roman catacombs, as well as in sculpture, her head is almost always covered with a veil, and she wears a tunic. She exists both as a separate symbol and as the main figure in a number of Biblical scenes, but rarely in masculine form with male clothing. Instead, she frequently stands in for male figures in scenes of deliverance—she becomes Noah in the ark, Jonah in the boat and spewed out of the whale, Daniel between the lions, and the three young men in the fiery furnace. In one instance, she does represent a female figure— Susannah as she is saved by Daniel.2

It is the salvation/deliverance aspect that appears to be the most common in early Christian art. Her exact meaning and usage, however, are debated, since there is no ancient literature to tell us exactly how her image was employed. Before considering the range of meanings she might have had, it is necessary to discuss the primary context of her image – the Roman catacombs. Continue reading

Titular Bible

I AM MAYA…

Continue reading

Moor Eyes of Aisa

Moirai

In Greek mythology, the Moirai (Μοῖραι) (mɪrˌiː), often known in English as the Fates (Latin: Fatae), were the white-robed incarnations of destiny; their Roman equivalent was the Parcae (euphemistically the “sparing ones”). Their number became fixed at three:
– Clotho (spinner),
– Lachesis (allotter) and
– Atropos (unturnable) [also called Moira, Morta or Aisa].

The Moirai controlled the mother thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction. The gods and men had to submit to them, although Zeus’s relationship with them is a matter of debate.

Some sources say Zeus is the only one who can command them (the Zeus Moiragetes), yet others suggest he was also bound to the Moirai’s dictates. In the Homeric poems Moira or Aisa, is related with the limit and end of life, and Zeus appears as the guider of destiny. In the Theogony of Hesiod, the three Moirai are personified, and are acting over the gods. Later they are daughters of Zeus and Themis, who was the embodiment of divine order and law. Continue reading

Eternal Curse for the Thiever

An Eternal Curse upon the Reader of These Lines
Robert K. Ritner, 2003

In retribution for the ‘prying’ or ‘intrusive curiosity’ inherent in the reading of another’s words, the Argentine novelist Manuel Puig entitled a 1980 work ‘Eternal Curse on the Reader of these Pages.’ The same sentiment appears in Egyptian magic. A Coptic curse preserved in the British Museum (Oriental Ms. 5986) begins with an invocation for divine wrath directed not against its primary victims (who are later damned by name), but against the accidental discoverer:

God of heaven and earth! Whoever shall open this papyrus and read what is written in (it), may all those things written in it descend upon him.1

A counterpart is provided by the Coptic Papyrus Lichaev, which concludes a specific curse with a similar generic warning:

Whoever opens this papyrus and reads it, what is written on it will come upon him, by order of the lord god.2

Such invocations of divine hostility have their origin well before Coptic Christianity, in magical practices of Late Period Egypt that exploit the bond between the demonic and the divine. Continue reading

Preparing for Initiation

Ile Ife ArtPREPARATION FOR INITIATION
by Awo Falokun Fatunmbi

Egun

The first step in preparation for initiation is to set up an ancestor shrine and to start asking the ancestors for support in the initiation process.

Building an Ancestor Shrine

In traditional Ifá culture everyone is believed to have the ability, and the obligation to communicate with the ancestors on a daily basis. According to Ifá oral tradition, communication with your ancestors is a
birthright and requires no special sanction. At times this communication can simply involve remembering a revered ancestor and making use of the memory as a basis for making an important decision. In many ways ancestor communication is an extension of the training and wisdom we receive from our parents and grand parents. In Yoruba culture it is common for the uninitiated to make direct contact with ancestors spirits. The most prevalent method of Continue reading