Tag Archives: Gods

42 Declarations of Innocence

KnightsofImhotepMuseum: Papyrus of Ani

The 42 Negative Confessions – E.A. Wallis Budge
From Rosicrucian Digest, No. 1, 2007

One of the best-known sections of the Book of the Coming Forth by Day (The Book of the Dead) in the Papyrus of Ani is the Negative Confession. The forty-two Gods and Goddesses of the Nomes of Egypt conduct this initiatory test of the soul before the scale of Ma’at. In this translation by pioneering Egyptologist E. A. Wallis Budge, we hear the initiate’s assertion of blamelessness before the Court of Osiris. For clarity, divine names and city names in parentheses have been added to the 1895 text of Chapter 125 from Budge’s 1913 edition.

1. Ani saith: “Hail, thou whose strides are long (Usekh-nemmt), who comest forth from Annu (Heliopolis), I have not done iniquity.”
2. “Hail, thou who art embraced by flame (Hept-khet), who comest forth from Kheraba, I have not robbed with violence.” Continue reading

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Dender And Light

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Holy Khet

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Sphinx Nose Shot Off for Pinterest Continue reading

Heru and A Kat

Copyright (c) 2001 - Andrew Bayuk, All Rights ReservedGuardian’s Shinx
Guardian of the Horizon

By Andrew Bayuk

The Sphinx of Giza [Her-em-Akhet] is a symbol that has represented the essence of Egypt for thousands of years. Even with all of the pictures that we see of the Sphinx, nothing can really prepare you for the time that you finally see the Sphinx with your own eyes. Here’s a look at the Sphinx that will give you a hint of what you can expect to see if you visit Egypt.

Carved from the bedrock of the Giza plateau, the Sphinx is truly a mysterious marvel from the days of ancient Egypt. The body of a lion with the head of a king or god, the sphinx has come to symbolize strength and wisdom. Continue reading

Sophia’s Cat

Her Em Akhet and Khephren pyramidThe Mystery of the Great Sphinx

By Brian Haughton, 2011 [Edited]

Buried for most of its life in the desert sand, an air of mystery has always surrounded the Great Sphinx, causing speculation about its age and purpose, method of construction, concealed chambers, role in prophecy, and relationship to the equally mysterious pyramids. Much of this theorizing is to the despair of Egyptologists and archaeologists.

The Mystery of the Great Sphinx
Facing the rising sun, the Great Sphinx is located on the Giza plateau, about 10 km west of Cairo, on the west bank of the Nile River. Later Egyptian rulers worshipped it as an aspect of the sun god, calling it Her-Em-Akhet (“Horus of the Horizon”). The Sphinx sits in part of the necropolis of ancient Memphis, the seat of power for the pharaohs, a short distance from three large pyramids – the Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops), Khafre (Chephren) and Menkaura (Mycerinus). Continue reading

Guarding Heru

Related imageHer-em-Akhet

From World Afropedia (Edited)

Heru-em-Akhut (Her-em-Akhet) is a Khemetan term that roughly translates to Heru in the Horizon. It is a Monument which depicts the head of an Afu-Ra-Kan [Afrikan] atop the body of a lion, known today as the ‘Great Sphinx of Giza’. Heru-em-Akhut was later used as the model for the hellenic “Harmakhus”.

Physical Description and Controversy

Throughout history, people have been perplexed by the majestic presence of Heru-em-Akhut. At over 66-feet high, 20-feet wide and 241-feet long, Heru-em-Akhut stands as the largest monolithic structure in the world. Its dimensions are as massive as its builders’ achievement–an achievement so great that, when later witnessed by european explorers, they concluded that a reality of it being built by Humans could not be possible.

Though it protected the horizon in Khemt, and was decorated wall-to-wall with Netjer Medu, european “scholars” have searched vigorously for its builders in some “ancient lost civilization”, or “proofs” to lend its fashioning to extraterrestrial ‘super-beings’. Continue reading

Envy of Seth – 2

THE RELIGION OF ANCIENT EGYPT
By W. M. FLINDERS PETRIE, 1906

Part 1 See here

CONTENTS
VII. THE COSMIC GODS
VIII. THE ABSTRACT GODS
IX. THE FOREIGN GODS
X. THE COSMOGONY
XI. THE RITUAL AND PRIESTHOOD
XII. THE SACRED BOOKS
XIII. PRIVATE WORSHIP
XIV. EGYPTIAN ETHICS
XV. THE INFLUENCE OF EGYPT

 

CHAPTER VII THE COSMIC GODS

The gods which personify the sun and sky stand apart in their essential idea from those already described, although they were largely mixed and combined with other classes of gods. So much did this mixture pervade all the later views that some writers have seen nothing but varying forms of sun-worship in Egyptian religion. It will have been noticed however in the previous chapters what a large body of theology was entirely apart from the sun-worship, while here we treat the latter as separate from the other elements with which it was more or less combined.

_Ra_ was the great sun-god, to whom every king pledged himself, by adopting on his accession a motto-title embodying the god’s name, such as _Ra-men-kau_, ‘Ra established the kas,’ Continue reading

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