Category Archives: Egypt

Abydos King’s List

Panoramio - Photo of Abydos King List

The Abydos King List, is a list of the names of seventy-six kings of Ancient KMT, found on a wall of the Temple of Seti I at Abydos. It consists of three rows of thirty-eight cartouches (borders enclosing the name of a king) in each row. The upper two rows contain names of the kings, while the third row merely repeats Seti I’s throne name and praenomen.

The start of the king list, showing Seti and his son – Ramesses II – on the way to making an offering to Ptah-Seker-Ausar, on behalf of their 72 ancestors – the contents of the king list. Ramesses is depicted holding censers.

1st Dynasty
Cartouches 1 to 8
1 Meni. Probably King Narmer. Menes
2 Teti. Same name in Turin King List. Hor-Aha
3 Iti. Same name in Turin King List. Djer
4 Ita. Called Itui in Turin King List. Djet Continue reading

Confusing Anubis (Anpu)

Image result for tehutiGreek Story of Anpu

Nephthys gave birth to a son called Anpu, or Anubis, and that his father was, according to some, Set; from another point of view he was the son of Ra.

[He] was the jackal god, and he was associated with the dead because the jackal was generally seen prowling about the tombs. His worship is very ancient, and there is no doubt that even the earliest times his cult was general in Egypt; it is probable that it is older than that of Osiris.

In the text of Unas {line 70 he is associated with the Eye of Horus, and his duty as the guide of the dead in the Underworld on their way to Osiris was well defined, even at the remote period when this composition was written, from we read, Unas standeth with the Spirits, get thee onwards, Anubis, into “Amenti {the Underworld, onwards, onwards to Osiris.”

In the lines that follow we see that Anubis is mentioned in connection with Horus, Set, [Tehuti], Sep, and Khent-an-maati. From another passage of the same text we find {line 207 ff that the hand, arms, belly, and legs of the deceased are identified with Temu, but his face is said to be in the form of that of Anubis. The localities in which Anubis was especially worshipped are Abt, the Papyrus Swamps, Sep, Re-au, Heru-ti, Ta-hetchet, Saint, {Lycopolis, Sekhem, {Letopolis, etc. Continue reading

Guarding Heru

Related imageHer-em-Akhet

From World Afropedia (Edited)

Heru-em-Akhut (Her-em-Akhet) is a Khemetan term that roughly translates to Heru in the Horizon. It is a Monument which depicts the head of an Afu-Ra-Kan [Afrikan] atop the body of a lion, known today as the ‘Great Sphinx of Giza’. Heru-em-Akhut was later used as the model for the hellenic “Harmakhus”.

Physical Description and Controversy

Throughout history, people have been perplexed by the majestic presence of Heru-em-Akhut. At over 66-feet high, 20-feet wide and 241-feet long, Heru-em-Akhut stands as the largest monolithic structure in the world. Its dimensions are as massive as its builders’ achievement–an achievement so great that, when later witnessed by european explorers, they concluded that a reality of it being built by Humans could not be possible.

Though it protected the horizon in Khemt, and was decorated wall-to-wall with Netjer Medu, european “scholars” have searched vigorously for its builders in some “ancient lost civilization”, or “proofs” to lend its fashioning to extraterrestrial ‘super-beings’. Continue reading

Envy of Seth – 2

THE RELIGION OF ANCIENT EGYPT
By W. M. FLINDERS PETRIE, 1906

Part 1 See here

CONTENTS
VII. THE COSMIC GODS
VIII. THE ABSTRACT GODS
IX. THE FOREIGN GODS
X. THE COSMOGONY
XI. THE RITUAL AND PRIESTHOOD
XII. THE SACRED BOOKS
XIII. PRIVATE WORSHIP
XIV. EGYPTIAN ETHICS
XV. THE INFLUENCE OF EGYPT

 

CHAPTER VII THE COSMIC GODS

The gods which personify the sun and sky stand apart in their essential idea from those already described, although they were largely mixed and combined with other classes of gods. So much did this mixture pervade all the later views that some writers have seen nothing but varying forms of sun-worship in Egyptian religion. It will have been noticed however in the previous chapters what a large body of theology was entirely apart from the sun-worship, while here we treat the latter as separate from the other elements with which it was more or less combined.

_Ra_ was the great sun-god, to whom every king pledged himself, by adopting on his accession a motto-title embodying the god’s name, such as _Ra-men-kau_, ‘Ra established the kas,’ Continue reading

Envy of Seth – 1

THE RELIGION OF ANCIENT EGYPT
By W. M. FLINDERS PETRIE, 1906

CONTENTS
I. THE NATURE OF GODS1
II. THE NATURE OF MAN
III. THE FUTURE LIFE
IV. ANIMAL WORSHIP
V. THE GROUPS OF GODS. ANIMAL-HEADED GODS
VI. THE HUMAN GODS

 

CHAPTER I THE NATURE OF GODS

Before dealing with the special varieties of the Egyptians’ belief in gods, it is best to try to avoid a misunderstanding of their whole conception of the supernatural. The term god has come to tacitly imply to our minds such a highly specialised group of attributes, that we can hardly throw our ideas back into the more remote conceptions to which we also attach the same name. It is unfortunate that every other word for supernatural intelligences has become debased, so that we cannot well speak of demons, devils, ghosts, or fairies without implying a noxious or a trifling meaning, quite unsuited to the ancient deities that were so beneficent and powerful. If then we use the word god for such conceptions, it must always be with the reservation that the word has now a very different meaning from what it had to ancient minds. Continue reading

Djed Symbol

Two ivory Djed pillars found in a
First Dynasty tomb at Helwan.
(photograph taken by J.D.Degreef)

The Concept of the Djed Symbol
By Vincent Brown, 2012

One of the most enigmatic symbols of Ancient Egypt is the Tet, or  Djed. Although it was widely used as a religious icon throughout much of the history and geography of Ancient Egypt, it is still not clearly understood what the Djed was originally conceived to represent. Determining its meaning from its appearance alone is not an easy task so we shall take some of the suggested definitions and analyse each individually. But first of all lets look at the key elements that make up the symbol.

Typical Distinctive Features:

  • Four horizontal bars surmounting a vertical shaft
  • Vertical striations between each bar
  • These striations are shown in profile on the sides of the Djed creating a curved appearance
  • Four bands around neck of the shaft
  • Sometimes a small capital can be seen surmounting the Djed
  • The Djed often stands on a rectangular base

Continue reading

Djed Pillar

The Djed-pillar
From Reshafim

The Djed-pillar, Egyptian Dd ,[1] is an ancient symbol for stability and endurance. It is mentioned in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom:

You shall emerge as Horus-of-the-Underworld at the head of those who never set and sit on your metal throne above the your canal belonging to the watery region (of the heavens), living like an ankh-beetle, enduring like a djed-pillar.

Pyramid Texts of Pepi I, PT 537 [2]

    The djed‘s magic could enhance endurance and stability of persons, institutions like the kingship, and of physical structures. One assumes that the djed-signs engraved on columns were hoped to improve the stability of the building.[3] Continue reading

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