Kleopatra – the Key

cleopatraDefense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

See part 1 – Ptah Ra Pater

Cleopatra

Let us discuss Cleopatra, the feminine aspect of this subject matter. We talked about the Father but what about the Mother? You find this marvelous archetype also in ancient Egypt. When people talk about Cleopatra, they always remember the Cleopatra who was with Mark Anthony, but they ignore that there were many Cleopatra long before her in ancient Egypt. A Cleopatra is a vestal of the temple. They are what we call in this day in age “nuns.”

Cleopatra derives from the Greek name Κλεοπατρα, Κλεος-Πτα (Kleopatra) which means “glory of Ptah, the father” derived from (κλεος – kleos) “glory.” This is combined with πατρος, patros, “of the father (Πτα – Ptah)” or Κλεος-Ποτήρ “glory of the cup” (ποτήρ – potēr). The cup, the yoni, the feminine sexual organ, is the Holy Grail. Thus, Kleo-poter is Cleopatra.  Potēr means cup, chalice, grail, the sexual yoni. When you say Cleopatra, you are indicating the feminine sexual force of God. This is why the Cleopatras were vestals in ancient Egypt.

  • Kleopatra: “keys to the father,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + patros [πατρος] father
  • Kleopatra, Kleopetra: “Keystone,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + petra [πέτρᾳ] “stone”

Thus, Kleopatra symbolizes the keystone, which in the previous lecture the speaker was explaining. The keystone of the temple, the cornerstone of th Continue reading

Ptah Ra Pater

ptah

Defense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

The graphic is of the African symbol Ptah, which as an archetype was very active in ancient KMT (now Egypt). We find Ptah in the Bible as Tso-Phtah Paneach צפתה פענח [Genesis 41:45]. Thus, we are also going to explain what Ptah symbolizes. That is why at the bottom of this powerful symbol or archetype we wrote the quotation of Hosea chapter 11, verse 1.

All of the prayers and wisdom that we find in Christianity, Islam and Judaism, emerge from the same land: KMT. When we study the African archetypes, which are very profound, Gnostics do not fall into the mistake of thinking like the ignoramuses who think that these are “idols.” We know what idols are, and what archetypes are.

The Prayer of the Lord, called in Latin “Pater Noster,” is powerful when we recite it in Latin, given the fact that Latin is a Romanic root language of different romance languages, such as Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese. We also find Latin words in the English language. Continue reading

KMT PI

Related imageSacred Geometry in Ancient Egypt
By M. Gadalla

The Cosmic Geometry
Herodotus, the father of history and a native Greek, stated in 500 BCE:

Now, let me talk more of Egypt for it has a lot of admirable things and what one sees there is superior to any other country.

The Ancient Egyptian works, large or small, are admired by all, because they are proportionally harmonious and as such appeal to our inner as well as outer feelings. This harmonic design concept is popularly known as sacred geometry—where all figures could be drawn or created using a straight line (not even necessarily a ruler) and compass, i.e. without measurement (dependent on proportion only).

The principles of sacred geometry are of Ancient Egyptian origin, which constituted the basis of harmonic proportions, as evident in their temples, buildings, theology, …etc. The Ancient Egyptian design followed these principles in well-detailed canons. Plato himself attested to the longevity of the Egyptian harmonic canon of proportion (sacred geometry), when he stated, “the pictures and statues made ten thousand years ago…”

The key to divine harmonic proportion (sacred geometry) is the relationship between progression of Continue reading

Wave’s Up, Dude

Waves – Lesson 1 – The Nature of a Wave
From Physics Classroom

Categories of Waves

Waves come in many shapes and forms. While all waves share some basic characteristic properties and behaviors, some waves can be distinguished from others based on some observable (and some non-observable) characteristics. It is common to categorize waves based on these distinguishing characteristics.

Longitudinal versus Transverse Waves versus Surface Waves

One way to categorize waves is on the basis of the direction of movement of the individual particles of the medium relative to the direction that the waves travel. Categorizing waves on this basis leads to three notable categories: transverse waves, longitudinal waves, and surface waves. Continue reading

Sonar Haram

Does Military Sonar Kill Marine Wildlife?
From Scientific American, June 10, 2009

Dear EarthTalk: Is it true that military sonar exercises actually kill marine wildlife? — John Slocum, Newport, RI

Unfortunately for many whales, dolphins and other marine life, the use of underwater sonar (short for sound navigation and ranging) can lead to injury and even death. Sonar systems—first developed by the U.S. Navy to detect enemy submarines—generate slow-rolling sound waves topping out at around 235 decibels; the world’s loudest rock bands top out at only 130. These sound waves can travel for hundreds of miles under water, and can retain an intensity of 140 decibels as far as 300 miles from their source.

These rolling walls of noise are no doubt too much for some marine wildlife. While little is known about any direct physiological effects of sonar waves on marine species, evidence shows that whales will swim hundreds of miles, rapidly change their depth (sometime leading to bleeding from the eyes and ears), and even beach themselves to get away from the sounds of sonar. Continue reading

Zone Ear

whaleHow does sonar work?
From Science Wire

Sonar is simply making use of an echo. When an animal or machine makes a noise, it sends sound waves into the environment around it. Those waves bounce off nearby objects, and some of them reflect back to the object that made the noise. It’s those reflected sound waves that you hear when your voice echoes back to you from a canyon. Whales and specialized machines can use reflected waves to locate distant objects and sense their shape and movement.

The range of low-frequency sonar is remarkable. Dolphins and whales can tell the difference between objects as small as a BB pellet from 50 feet (15 meters) away, and they use sonar much more than sight to find their food, families, and direction. Continue reading

Great Barrier Bleach

Reef on the brink
The Great Barrier Reef: a catastrophe laid bare
By Michael Slezak, 7 June 2016

Australia’s natural wonder is in mortal danger. Bleaching caused by climate change has killed almost a quarter of its coral this year and many scientists believe it could be too late for the rest. Using exclusive photographs and new data, a Guardian special report investigates how the reef has been devastated – and what can be done to save it

It was the smell that really got to diver Richard Vevers. The smell of death on the reef. “I can’t even tell you how bad I smelt after the dive – the smell of millions of rotting animals.” Continue reading