Category Archives: South-America

More 21 Divisiones

Spirit World of Dominican VuduVODOUN – 21 NATIONS UNDER GOD SANCE TRADITION

From thebestlovespell, 2013 [Edited]

Contrary to popular belief the first Africans to set foot on Puerto Rico or the Americas for that matter where free men. Even as late as 150, a West African man who was the son of a Yoruba King and later baptized “Juan Garrido” was an African Conquistador who worked for Juan Ponce de Leon, “Puerto Rico’s first Governor” and was the first African man to set foot on Puerto Rican soil after the European ‘conquest’ and almost 100 years prior to the first Africans caught in the European slavery system to be taken to the United States “Jamestown 1607”.  Another African man, called Pedro Mejías, was married to the last Cacica Chief of Puerto Rico, Yuiza who like Pedro Mejias, was baptized a Catholic and renamed “Luisa” in order for both to be legally wed under Spanish law. Like the Dominican Anacaona in the Agua Dulce Division, Yuiza was the last female Cacica “Chief” to then become part of the Spirits venerated in Puerto Rican Sance.

Like the European enslavers, the African people came from different societies and tribes, each having their own dialect, language and culture. Haitian Vodou or Voudun consists of 21 Nations or Nasyons of Lwa – what Dominicans call los Loases or Misterios de La 21 Divisiones (also known as Budű or Vudű Dominicano.) Continue reading

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Nimrod de Rosario Moyano

Hyperborean Wisdom of Nimrod de Rosario and Gnostic Geopolitics
From Geopolitica,
2014

Luis Felipe Moyano (1946-1996), better known as Nimrod de Rosario, was an Argentinian writer who deeply and extensively studied comparative religions, spirituality and mythology throughout history; developing a Gnostic Cosmology known as Hyperborean Wisdom.

He is the author of “El Misterio de Belicena Villca”, a mystic-historical novel, and of the two volumes treatise “Fundamentos de la Sabiduría Hiperbórea”, a complex study including many scientific details, dealing often with Physics and time-space correlations.

He also was the founder of the esoteric secret society OCTRA (Orden de Caballeros Tirodal de la República Argentina – “Tirodal Order of Knights of the Argentinian Republic”, being “Tirodal” a contraction of the names of the two runes “Tyr” and “Odal”), and did correspond with well known Chilean writer Miguel Serrano (1917-2009). It is said by some of Nimrod´s followers that Serrano took many of his Gnostic and esoteric concepts from Nimrod´s writings without quoting him, being this the Continue reading

Chan Chan

Chan-Chan, The timeless citadel of clay
From Machu Picchu Gateway [edited]

This enormous archaeological complex is located in front of the sea, half way between the Huanchaco hot springs and the city of Trujillo, which is the capital of the department of Lambayeque, in the north coast of Perú.

The site covers an extension of 20 km; the central zone is formed by 10 places with walls, called citadels, a few structures with a pyramidal shape, and the rest is formed by sidewalks, walls and cemeteries in bad shape.

The heart of Chan-Chan is formed by 10 citadels, called that way because of its big volume, resembling small cities with big walls. The way that Chan-Chan was built shows the status of each layer of its the society, located in different areas. Continue reading

Oya and Shango and Oya

Oya and Shango - CKOya, Yansa
From Soulmindbody, 2010

Wind in her hair
Lightning in her eyes
Storms in her voice
And thunder in her thighs!

Sacred number: 9
Sacred colors: Brown, orange, purple, arterial blood red, deep red, burgundy, maroon, rainbow plus black, brown, and white
Symbols and Embodiments: Storms, wind, whirlwinds, hurricanes, storm and/or disease vector symbols, chaos symbol (cross of two or four arrows) with whirlwind (tapering zigzag), more symbols below… Continue reading

Oya Yansan

Oya - Lazaro BrandNinth child – Oya
From The Yoruba Religious Concepts

Not unlike her sisters, Oya Llasan Yansan, brought a physical beauty to the world. Her appearance also brought great conflict to the orisa. Oya had eyes of amber they where large and round and very expressive. When the people made eye contact with her, they would fall under her spell. With her birth into the kingdom also came the breath of life and movement of air, great storms and tornadoes.

Although she was female and feminine, She had a strong temperament and when she was forced to she would assume the personality of a masculine warrior in battle as well as lead others into war fighting as a equal at their side. Oya had the soul of a Continue reading

Oya

Oya - Dylan MeconisOya – Great Orisha goddess of Wind, Storms and Guardian Between Worlds
From African American Wiccan Society

Oya is a Great Yoruban Orisha. She is the goddess of Storms and Winds, and Her realm ranges from rainbows to thunder.  Her name means “She Who Tore” in Yoruba.  She can manifest as winds ranging from the gentlest breeze to the raging hurricane or cyclone.

Oya is known as a fierce Warrior goddess and a strong Protectress of women, who call upon Her. She assists us with rapid inner and outer transformation. Oya, is about absolute change (especially for the good) and is not a slow or very patient energy. According to Luisah Teish in the book, Jambalaya, Continue reading

Brazilian Macumba

Learn Moor About Bahia Brasil | Salvador Bahia | Afro Brazilian: Orishá Statues at Dique Do ...Macumba

“Macumba” (also known as Quimbanda) is the everyday term used by Brazilians in Rio de Janeiro to describe two types of African spirit worship: Candomble (followed in northern State of Bahia) and Umbanda (a newer form originating in Niteroi in the southern State of Rio de Janeiro).

Macumba originated with enslaved Africans shipped to Brazil in the 1550s, who continued to worship African Gods. Their Gods are called ORIXAS (Orisha). Africans incorporated their religion into Brazilian culture and white European religion (Roman Catholic). They summoned their Gods with their drums. European enslavers, unlike those in the United States, allowed Africans to continue to use their drums. Thus began the rhythm of the saints, the samba, and it explains why Brazilian “batucadas” reign unequaled today. Brazil got the samba, and the U.S. got “the blues.” Continue reading

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