Tag Archives: Hieroglyphs

Nsibidi Symbols

Nsibidi name written.jpgNsibidi

Nsibidi (also known as nsibiri, nchibiddi or nchibiddy) is a system of symbols indigenous to what is now southeastern Nigeria that is apparently ideographic, though there have been suggestions that it includes logographic elements. The symbols are at least several centuries old: Early forms appeared on excavated pottery as well as what are most likely ceramic stools and headrests from the Calabar region, with a range of dates from between 400 and 1400 CE.

There are thousands of nsibidi symbols, of which over Continue reading

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Using Wallis Budge

Who the hell translated this?“Who the hell translated this? It’s completely wrong. They must have used Budge; I don’t know why they keep reprinting his books!” – Daniel Jackson, from the movie, “Stargate”

Using Budge = BAD IDEA!
By Fanny Fae, 2013

People: I am here to tell you once and for all, ditch the Budge translations that you have. Stop using them in your arguments and your writings. You are making your work and yourself into a laughing stock. I don’t care that you have meticulously collected all of his works over time or how much you spent for that gold embossed, leather bound volume of the Ancient Egyptian Book of the Dead It’s as of this writing, about 150 years out of date. If you do choose to ignore the advice and use him anyway, any of your Continue reading

Fayum and Sobek (2)

OSIRIS IN THE FAYYUM
Marco Zecchi
From Fayyum Studies 2
Edited by Sergio Pernigotti and Marco Zecchi, 2006

Part 1

Osiris in the Fayyum had to leave his power to his successor, who in the region took the aspect of Sobek-Horus. In the hymns in honour of Sobek of Shedet in the papyrus Ramesseum VI of the XII-XIII dynasty (P-1), Osiris certainly is a dead god, the main presence in the crucial moment of the passage of royal power from him to his son. Here, Sobek-Horus is described while he looks for the scattered body of his father Osiris and performs for him the rituals necessary to his resurrection. In this way, Sobek-Horus can finally become king of Upper and Lower Egypt: Continue reading

Fayum and Ausar (1)

OSIRIS IN THE FAYYUM
Marco Zecchi
From Fayyum Studies 2
Edited by Sergio Pernigotti and Marco Zecchi, 2006

One of the most crucial and unavoidable issues in studying a polytheistic religion is the problem of gods’ identities. In this respect, Osiris is a problematic figure, whose identity one could never expect to master. Osiris’ origins remains unclear and a number of factors are important in attempting to unravel his identity, his birth and personal qualities and, above all, the events of his life and death.

The fact that his cult spread throughout Egypt made him an‘universal’ god, who belonged to all Egyptians. The particular inflections that his identity took on through its dissemination in various localities undoubtedly played an important role in the construction and reconstruction of his character Continue reading

KMT Egyptian Numerals

Oudjat_SVGEgyptian numerals

The system of ancient Egyptian numerals was a system of numeration based on the scale of ten, often rounded off to the higher power, written in hieroglyphs. The hieratic form of numerals stressed an exact finite series notation, ciphered one to one onto the Egyptian alphabet.

Digits and numbers

The following hieroglyphics were used to denote powers of ten: Continue reading

KMT – Tehuti (2)

Tehuti HieroglyphTEHUTI – THOTH (- HERMES): god of scribes, science, magic, time medicine, reckoning, cults, wisdom and the peace of the gods. The companion of MA’AT.

The meaning of Tehuti’s name (“DHwtii” or “Djehuti”), represented by the hieroglyph of the Ibis, is unknown. Egyptologists propose “he of Djehout” (an unknown location), “he of the castle of speech”, “he who speaks in the temple”, “messenger”, “he who selects”, “he who chooses”. Nothing is certain. He seems an accumulation of cognitive deities. Continue reading

Nsibidi Script

NsibidiNsibidi is an ancient system of graphic communication indigenous to the Ejagham peoples of southeastern Nigeria and southwestern Cameroon in the Cross River region. It is also used by neighboring Ibibio, Efik and Igbo peoples.
 
Aesthetically compelling and encoded, nsibidi does not correspond to any one spoken language. It is an ideographic script whose symbols refer to abstract concepts, actions or things and whose use facilitates communication among peoples speaking different languages.
 
Nsibidi comprises nearly a thousand symbols that Continue reading