Category Archives: Aztec Maya Zapotec

Aztec Tehuti – Quetzal coatl

Quetzalcoatl – Codex Telleriano

Quetzalcoatl
From Chrystalinks

Quetzalcoatl (ket-sal-ko-a-tel) is a Meso-american deity whose name comes from the Nahuatl language and has the meaning of “feather-serpent”.

The worship of a feathered serpent deity is first documented in Teotihuacan in the Late Preclassic through the Early Classic period (400 BCE – 600CE) of Meso-american chronology –  whereafter it appears to have spread throughout Mesoamerica by the Late Classic (600 – 900 CE) (Ringle et al.).

In the Postclassic period (900 – 1519 CE) the Continue reading

Maya Caste War of Yucatán

yucatan-map-yrCaste War of Yucatán

The Caste War of Yucatán (1847–1901) began with the revolt of native Maya people of Yucatán, Mexico against the population of European descent, called Yucatecos, who held political and economic control of the region.

A lengthy war ensued between the Yucateco forces in the north-west of the Yucatán and the independent Maya in the south-east. It officially ended with the occupation of the Maya capital of Chan Santa Cruz by the Mexican army in 1901, although skirmishes with villages and small settlements that refused to acknowledge Mexican control Continue reading

Five Suns

5 suns - mexicoloreFive Suns

The term Five Suns in the context of creation myths, describes the doctrine of the Aztec and other Nahua peoples in which the present world was preceded by four other cycles of creation and destruction. It is primarily derived from the mythological, cosmological and eschatological beliefs and traditions of earlier cultures from central Mexico and the Meso-american region in general. The Late Postclassic Aztec society inherited many traditions concerning Meso-american creation accounts, while however modifying some aspects and supplying novel interpretations of their own. Continue reading

Zapotec Day Signs

Zapotec days

Zapotec – Pro-Aztec

Zapotec CociyoZapotec

One of the earliest and most enduring scribal traditions in Mesoamerica developed in the central valleys of Oaxaca. Seemingly a logo-syllabic system since its inception, ca 600 BCE, several lines of evidence strongly suggest that the script encoded an ancient version of the contemporary Zapotecan family of languages.

The early societal uses of writing that can be elicited from what survives in the archaeological record were to promote group identities in the genesis of widening social inequalities, differential access to power, political centralization, and urbanism.

Through time, the script spread over a wide portion of southwestern Mesoamerica, at times imposed by groups with hegemonic interests, or appropriated by aspiring elites to form part of increasingly wider networks of interaction. These processes led the script in a trajectory that minimized phoneticism (confined as time went on to renditions of personal names and toponyms) but maximized logophonic, semantic, and hence multilingual encoding. Continue reading

Haab – Maya Month Signs

Haab – 365 days

The Haab, or “vague” year, is the one most similar to the Christian calendar. With 365 days in its count, it is obviously based on solar observations. It’s called the “vague” year because, unlike the Christian calendar, it does not include a leap year. The Haab was in use by at least 100 BC and was created to be used in conjunction with the Tzolk’in.

(Image adapted from Voss, 2000)

The Eighteen months of the Haab
In point of fact, one cannot find a Haab date that is not recorded with a Tzolk’in date within ancient hieroglyphic texts. In operation together, the Haab and Tzolk’in create a larger, 52-year cycle called the Calendar Round that was used not only by the Maya but also by every other culture in Mesoamerica.

The Haab is made up of 18 months of 20 days each and a final short month of only 5 days. Together they form the 365-day, solar-based year. Continue reading

Maya Month Signs

sign Witch zodiac astrology witchcraft pagan wicca Gods ...

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