Tag Archives: Qur’an

Fuad in Islam

The Heart: Fu’aad, Qalb and Sadr
By Amatullah [based on notes of Nouman’s lecture], 2009

In the Qur’an, [there are] three words to describe our hearts: qalb, fuad and sadr. We know that every Arabic word is chosen for a reason, yet all three of these words for the most part are translated as “heart.” As usual, the intricate meanings of these words are not captured in the translation.

So, what is their difference?

Qalb

Qalb is the general word for heart. It comes from the root which means something that turns around and about and upside down. It is the nature of hearts that they are constantly changing, this is the normal state of our hearts. When ta’ala refers to eman and diseases of the heart, qalb is used.

Fu’ad

Fu’ad is from the verb fa’ada meaning burning or a flame. Continue reading

Advertisements

Malamati Sufi Order

Sufism Way of BlameMalamatiyya

The Malāmatiyya (ملامتية) or Malamatis were a mystic group active in the 9th century Greater Khorasan. Their root word of their name is the Arabic word malāmah (ملامة) “blame”. The Malamatiyya believed in the value of self-blame, that piety should be a private matter and that being held in good esteem would lead to worldly attachment. They concealed their knowledge and made sure their faults would be known, reminding them of their imperfection. The Malamati is one for whom the doctrine of “spiritual states” is fraught with subtle deceptions of the most despicable kind; he despises personal piety, not because he is focused on the perceptions or reactions of people, but as a consistent involuntary witness of his own “pious hypocrisy”. Continue reading

Iblis the Serpent

A research about Adam, his wife, Iblis and what happened while in the Garden and does Iblis have children
By Khidr Amari, 2012

There are many meanings of the Arabic word Jinn can be found in the Qur’an in terms of its expression.

Allah says that when Musa saw the staff wiriting as if it was a snake:

“And he was told, “Throw down your staff.” But when he saw it writhing as if it jānnun (were a snake), he turned in flight and did not return. [Allah said], “O Moses, approach and fear not. Indeed, you are of the secure.” Sura 28:31

Allah says when we were in mother wombs were were fetuses: Continue reading

Iblis the Angel

Qur’an Incoherence and Contradiction
Is Satan an Angel or a Jinn?
Analyzing the Quran’s Confusing Statements
By Sam Shamoun

The Quran, in many citations, portrays Satan or Iblis as an angel:

And (remember) when We said to the angels: “Prostrate yourselves before Adam.” And they prostrated except Iblis (Satan), he refused and was proud and was one of the disbelievers (disobedient to Allah). S. 2:34

And (remember) when your Lord said to the angels: “I am going to create a man (Adam) from sounding clay of altered black smooth mud. So, when I have fashioned him completely and breathed into him (Adam) the soul which I created for him, then fall (you) down prostrating yourselves unto him.” So, the angels prostrated themselves, all of them together. Except Iblis Continue reading

Iblis

Iblis

In Islam, the Devil is known as Iblīs (Arabic: إبليس‎, plural: ابالسة abālisah) or Shayṭān (Arabic: شيطان‎, plural: شياطين shayāṭīn). In Islam, Iblis is a jinni who refused to bow to Adam.

The primary characteristic of the Devil, besides hubris, is that he has no power other than the power to cast evil suggestions into humans and jinn, although the Quran mentions appointing jinn to assist those who are far from God in a general context. “We made the evil ones friends (only) to those without faith.”

Namings and etymology

Iblis in Arabic verbal root balasa بَلَسَ, meaning ‘he despaired’; therefore, the meaning of Iblīs would be ‘he/it that causes despair’. Continue reading

Bread and Salt

Al-Harith and his companions. From Serving the Guest: A Sufi Cookbook
Kathleen Seide, 1999

Bread & Salt: The Common Bond

Bread signifies all God given provisions, the abundance in simplicity, the Giver and gift of life in its continuous flow, first things in the day, essential priorities.

A traveler on the mystic path
is content with a loaf of bread;
By its light he may be turned
towards the Light of God.
— Rumi

Aish, “life,” is one ancient Arabic term for bread; accordingly, it is treated with reverence throughout the Continue reading

Seven Sleepers And No Dog

Seven Sleepers

The Seven Sleepers, commonly called the “Seven Sleepers of Ephesus”, refers to a group of Christian youths who hid inside a cave outside the city of Ephesus around 250 AD, to escape a persecution of Christians being conducted during the reign of the Roman emperor Decius. Another version is that Decius ordered them imprisoned in a closed cave to die there as punishment for being Christians. Having fallen asleep inside the cave, they purportedly awoke approximately 180 years later during the reign of Theodosius II, following which they were reportedly seen by the people of the now-Christian city before dying. Continue reading

%d bloggers like this: