Tag Archives: Caribbean

Dominican Myths

Myths and Legends/ Mitos y Leyendas

Folclore de la República Dominicana/ Folklore of the Dominican Republic

Chupacabra/ Goat Sucker or Evil thingcould this be the chupacabra of legends?
The chupacabra is (supposedly) alien in origin and was brought here by a UFO. It is a living creature that looks like a hunched alien with a line of sharp spikes down the middle of it’s back exactly where the spine is located. It has gray skin that is part fur and part feathers. It has short arms ending with long nasty claws. Its legs are like a kangaroos.
The chupacabra is said to be about 4 feet tall when standing erect. This gray being has huge red elongated glowing eyes, the better to see you with. They are said to be very powerful and people have reported seeing the chupacabra fly.

Creatures fitting this description were said to be spotted first in Puerto Rico in the mid-1990s. Then, a few years later, the chupacabra started showing up in Mexico, South Florida, Central America, and South America including Dominican Republic. Although few people have actually claimed to seeing a real chupacabra many claim to have seen the works of this blood sucking alien being. Continue reading

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Dominican Travel

firefly but I figured it belonged here also....: Fire Fly, Fireflies ...Legends of the Dominican Republic

By Robert Nickel, 2011 [Edited]

Although myths and legends are by definition largely untrue, each one of us has a little inkling in us that suspects there may be some truth to the story. Regardless of your assertion that you do not believe in such things, it is still fun to hear the mythical stories tied to a vacation destination. They give a great insight into the people and culture of the region, as well as offer an explanation on seemingly strange behavior you might encounter. Here are some of the most prevalent legends of the Dominican Republic.

Fireflies are fairly common in the Dominican, but are referred to as the Nimitas. The people believe Nimitas are the souls of the dead watching their loved ones. Their lights are a reminder for everyone that they are there and watching every move you make. Continue reading

Grab Hold of N’kisi

Male Nkisi Figure with Strips of Hide, held at the  Brooklyn Museum, CC

Nkisi

Nkisi (plural minkisi, zinkisi or nkisi [n- concords with mi-] according to dialect). The term nkisi is the general name for a a spirit, or for any object that spirit inhabits. It is frequently applied to a variety of objects used throughout the Congo Basin in Central Africa thought to contain spiritual powers or spirits. The term and its concept have passed with the enslavement of Africans into the Americas, especially South America (in Palo Mayombe the spirits of nkisi are often called “[…]”).

Meaning
The current meaning of the term derives from the root, *-kitį- referring to a spiritual entity, or material objects in which it is manifested or inhabits in Proto-Njila, an ancient subdivision of the Bantu language family.

In its earliest attestations in Kikongo dialects in the early seventeenth century it was spelled “mokissie” (in Dutch), as the mu- prefix in this noun class were still pronounced, and was reported by Dutch visitors to Loango as referring both to a material item and the spiritual entity that inhabits it. In the sixteenth century, when the Kingdom of Kongo was converted to Christianity, ukisi (a substance having characteristics of nkisi) was used to translate “holy” in the Kikongo Catechism of 1624. Continue reading

Preparing for Initiation

Ile Ife ArtPREPARATION FOR INITIATION
by Awo Falokun Fatunmbi

Egun

The first step in preparation for initiation is to set up an ancestor shrine and to start asking the ancestors for support in the initiation process.

Building an Ancestor Shrine

In traditional Ifá culture everyone is believed to have the ability, and the obligation to communicate with the ancestors on a daily basis. According to Ifá oral tradition, communication with your ancestors is a
birthright and requires no special sanction. At times this communication can simply involve remembering a revered ancestor and making use of the memory as a basis for making an important decision. In many ways ancestor communication is an extension of the training and wisdom we receive from our parents and grand parents. In Yoruba culture it is common for the uninitiated to make direct contact with ancestors spirits. The most prevalent method of Continue reading

The Holy Piby

The Holy PibyThe Holy Piby
by Robert Athlyi Roberts (1924)

Preface 

The Holy Piby, a book founded by the Holy Spirit to deliver the gospel commanded by the Almighty God for the full salvation of Ethiopia’s posterities.

In time the Piby shall contain all worthy prophecies and inspirations endowed by God upon the sons and daughters of Ethiopia, but no article shall be permitted to enter the Piby save that which is in accordance with the gospel of the twentieth century, preached by his Holiness, Shepherd Athlyi, apostle Marcus Garvey and colleague; the three apostles anointed and sent forth by the Almighty God to lay the Continue reading

Prayers to the Ori-Kra

PRAYERS TO THE ORISHAS
A LOOK AT SANTERÍA
By Diane Elizabeth Caudillo, 2007

Introduction

Who owns your head? This provocative question means a great deal to many people around the world who practice a religion known as Santería, or alternatively La Regla de Ocha. This tradition originates among the Yoruba people of West Africa, in the area of present-day Nigeria.

A great percentage of the [enslaved Africans] who were brought to the New World were Yoruban— according to David Brown of Emory University, 500,000 Africans were taken into Cuba between 1800 and 1870, and one third were Yoruban or from Yoruban-influenced areas.1 According to Robert Farris Thompson, 40% of all Africans abstracted from Africa came from the Kongo and Angola regions.2 This fact helps explain some of the traditions observable today in the United States, in the form of yard shows, bottle trees, words like “banjo”- “mbanja” and “goober” (peanut) – “mgooba”. Many popular dance and musical styles – the Charleston, jug bands, jazz – owe Continue reading

Day of the Dead

Gideon (Guede) – Loa spirits family, which is owned by the forces of death and fertility.

Fete Gede – Day of the Dead

Start: 1 November 2015
Venue: National Cemetery, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

This annual Vodou Festival represents Day of the Dead, which is carried out for the playful Haitian spirits. Rituals carried out within a month, but the majority of them at the beginning.

The faithful gather at the main cemetery in the capital of Haiti, to honor all Gede and their father, Baron Samedi (On Saturday). At the entrance to the cemetery on a pedestal with a cross, which symbolizes the entrance into the possession of Baron Samedi. Here, people are preparing a special drink, which sprinkle the cross.

People bring gifts: beeswax candles, flowers, bottles of rum with chilli. So they warm the bones of Gede. Continue reading