Tag Archives: Hinduism

Goddess Tara

Tara Bronze CrystalinksGoddess of Compassion – One Who Saves
By Crystalinks.com

Diamonds are Her Sacred Stone.

Tara or Arya Tara, also known as Jetsun Dolma, is a female Bodhisattva typically associated with Tibetan Buddhism. She is the “mother of liberation”, and represents the virtues of success in work and achievements.

Tara is actually the generic name for a set of Bodhisattvas of similar aspect. These may more properly be understood as different aspects of the same quality, as Bodhisattvas are often considered metaphoric for Buddhist virtues. As Mahatara, Great Tara, she is the supreme creatrix and mother of all the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas.

Tara is the Feminine Goddess Archetype in Hindu Mythology. Tara governs the Underworld, the Earth and the Heavens, birth, death and regeneration, love and war, the seasons, all that lives and grows, the Moon cycles – Luna – feminine – creation.

Her animals are the sow, mare, owl and raven.

She is the most popular figure in the Tibetan pantheon of deities, the beautiful goddess Tara, (pronounced tah’ rah) whose name in means ‘Star’ – originated in Indian Hinduism as the Continue reading

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Nagas

The Nagas
From Khandro Website

The word Naga comes from the Sanskrit, and nag is still the word for snake, especially the cobra, in most of the languages of India.

When we come upon the word in Buddhist writings, it is not always clear whether the term refers to a cobra, an elephant (perhaps this usage relates to its snake-like trunk, or the pachyderm’s association with forest-dwelling peoples of north-eastern India called Nagas), or even a mysterious person of nobility.

It is a term used for unseen beings associated with water and fluid energy, and also with persons having powerful animal-like qualities or conversely, an impressive animal with human qualities. Continue reading

Rahu and Ketu

Rahu & Ketu
By C. Hartley, 1997

According to the Sanskrit epic poem, the Mahabharata, the Hindu gods decided to mix up a batch of soma, the elixir of immortality. The gods were to drink the elixir to become immortal. The gods needed help from the demons to stir up the oceans to produce the elixir.

Out of the churning oceans the Sun, Moon, many goddess, and magic things were produced along with the soma. Vishnu took charge of distributing the freshly made soma to the gods but while it was being passed out the demons started battling with the gods for a taste of the elixir and in the confusion one of the demons, Rahu, disguised himself as a god and drank some of the elixir. Continue reading

Kali

Kali the Goddess: Gentle Mother, Fierce Warrior
By Madhuri Guin

O Kali, my mother full of bliss! Enchantress of the almighty Shiva!
In Thy delirious joy Thou dancest, clapping Thy hands together!
Thou art the Mover of all that move, and we are but Thy helpless toys.
— Ramakrishna Paramhans

Kali is one of the most well known and worshipped Hindu Goddesses. The name Kali is derived from the Hindu word that means “time”, and that also means “black”.

Kali in Hinduism, is a manifestation of the Divine Mother, which represents the female principle. Frequently, those not comprehending her many roles in life call Kali the goddess of destruction. She destroys only to recreate, and what she destroys is sin, ignorance and decay. She is equated with the eternal night, is the transcendent power of time, and is the consort of the god Shiva. Continue reading

Max Müller and the Vedas

max mullerMax Müller. A paid employee, who translated the Rigved in a demeaning style. The hidden secrets of his life.
By Swami Prakashanand Saraswati, 1999

1. Max Müller was a British agent, especially employed (in 1847) to write the translations of the Vedas in such a demeaning way so that the Hindus should lose faith in them. His personal letter to his wife dated December 9, 1867 reveals this fact.

2. He was highly paid for this job. According to the statistical information given on page 214 of the “English Education, 1798-1902” by John William Adamson, printed by Cambridge University Press in 1930, the revised scale of a male teacher was £90 per year and for a woman, £60 in 1853. The present salary of a teacher in London is £14,000 to £36,000 per year, which averages a minimum of at least 200 times Continue reading

Rahu and Ketu Kala Sarpa

nodes - starworlds12 Types of Kalsarpa Yoga in Astrology
From Hindu Devotional Blog

The person who has Kala Sarpa Yoga in his horoscope will suffer from various problems in life. Hence Kala Sarpa Yogam or Kalsarpa Yoga is regarded as a deadly yoga in Hindu astrology. Kala Sarpa Yoga is formed when all the planets are hemmed between the Navagraha Planets Lord Rahu and Lord Ketu in one’s horoscope.

There are mainly 12 types of Kala Sarpa Yoga. Below are the details of the twelve Kala Sarpa Yogas and the positives and negatives of the yogas.

Anant Kalsarpa Yoga Continue reading

Mandala Introduction

Thangka painting of Vajradhatu MandalaMandala

Mandala (Sanskrit: मण्डल Maṇḍala, ‘circle’) is a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism, representing the Universe. The basic form of most mandalas is a square with four gates containing a circle with a center point. Each gate is in the general shape of a T. Mandalas often exhibit radial balance.

Mandala appears in the Rig Veda as the name of the sections of the work, but is also used in other Indian religions, particularly Buddhism.

In various spiritual traditions, mandalas may be employed for focusing attention of aspirants and adepts, as a spiritual teaching tool, for establishing a sacred space, and as an aid to meditation and trance induction. Continue reading