Tag Archives: Language

Qumran Sedeq

The Teacher of Righteousness
in the Qumran Texts
By F. F. BRUCE, 1957

I. THE TEACHER AND THE TEXTS
‘The Teacher of Righteousness’ is the name given in a number of the lately discovered Qumran documents to a man who was held in high veneration by the religious community on whose beliefs and practices these documents have thrown so much light. If he was not actually the founder of the community, it was certainly he who impressed upon it those features which distinguished it from other pious groups which flourished among the Jews during the last two or three centuries of the Second Commonwealth. So far as we can gather from our present sources of information, he is never referred to by his personal name in the Qumran texts.1

The title bestowed on him by his followers, ‘The Teacher of Righteousness’ (Heb. moreh sedeq or moreh hassedeq), may echo Hosea x. 12, where the prophet calls to his people: ‘break up your fallow ground: for it is time to seek the LORD, till he come and rain righteousness (Heb. yoreh sedeq) upon you.’ The RV margin gives ‘teach you righteousness’ as an alternative translation to ‘rain righteousness Continue reading

Titular Bible

I AM MAYA…

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Loa Veve

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MtoW of Adinkra Symbols

Adinkra Index

See ABDE

See FGHK

mate masieMATE MASIE -“what I hear, I keep” wisdom, knowledge, prudence
Ntesi-Matemasi symbolizes wisdom and knowledge. “Nyasa bun mu nne mate masie masie.”

me ware woME WARE WO -“I shall marry you” commitment, perseverance Continue reading

FGHK of Adinkra Symbols

Adinkra Symbols

Tradition has it that Adinkra, a famous king of Gyaman (now part of Cote d’Ivoire) angered the Asantehene, Bonsu-Panyin, by trying to copy the Golden Stool. Adinkra was defeated and slain in an ensuing war. It has been suggested that the art of adinkra came from Gyaman. It is also significant that adinkra means farewell, or good-bye, hence the use of the special cloth on funeral occasions (eyie), to say good-bye to the departed.

Adinkra aduru (adinkra medicine) is the stuff used in the stamping process. It is prepared by boiling the bark of badie together with iron slag. Originally the printing was done on a cotton piece lying on the ground. Today, raised platforms with sack coverings act as the printing table. The designs, cut on pieces of calabash with pieces of wood attached for handling, are dipped into the adinkera aduru, then stamped onto the cloth. Adinkra cloth is not meant Continue reading

ABDE of Adinkra Symbols

Adinkra Cloth from afroetic.com

African Symbols: Adinkra

The Adinkra symbols were originally designed by “Asante” Craftsment of Ghana, West Africa.

The symbols embody non-verbal communicative and aesthetic values, as well as the way of life of the people who designed them.

The symbols are usually printed on cotton fabric to produce “Adinkra cloths,” which may be worn on such celebrative occasions as child naming, community durbars and funerary rituals.

Each of the symbols has its Asante name and an accompanying literal English translation.


ADINKRA INDEX

ADINKRAHENE – “chief of adinkra symbols” greatness, charisma, leadership
This symbol is said to have played an inspiring role in the designing of other symbols. it signifies the importance of playing a leadership role.
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NLP Everyone

TropheeNeurolinguistic Programming and other Nonsense
By Steven Novella, 2007

There is an episode of Spongebob (one of those few cartoons accessible to both young children and adults) where Patrick, upset that his friend Spongebob has won so many awards and he has won none, decides to copy everything Spongebob does. Patrick is a lazy, dumb, pathetic, (but charming) do-nothing, and he is no less so by simply mimicking Spongebob’s every move – hence the comic irony my four-year-old can appreciate. Neurolinguistic programming (NLP), at its core, takes the Patrick approach to success and counseling.

The wikipedia entry on NLP is fairly factually thorough, and I won’t waste time here reproducing it, so for background I suggest reading the entry. Also, Continue reading