Category Archives: Europe

Saving Bull (2)

Duomo di Monreale | Art and FaithHistory of the Devil
By Paul Carus, [1900]

THE IDEA OF SALVATION IN GREECE AND ITALY.

Part 1 Here

In the days of Augustus and his successors the people were taught to expect salvation, the dispensation of justice, protection, peace, and prosperity from the emperor; and just as we have to-day monarchies where the king regards himself as the Anointed One by the grace of God and a representative of God on earth, so the Roman emperor arrogated to himself divine honors, and even philosophers such as Seneca did not hesitate to acknowledge the claim. The practical significance of this view is that the government should be regarded with religious awe, and its officers, as such, are divine. The Christians who refused to worship before the emperor’s images must have appeared to the Romans of those days as anarchists and rebels. But when Nero committed matricide and other most outrageous crimes, the belief in the emperor’s divinity dwindled away, and the idea of the suffering God, the man who died on the cross because he would rather be than appear just, gained ground among the people.

Christianity was not the only religion which promised deliverance from evil through the saving power of blood and by means of a vicarious atonement, for we know of the immortality-promising mysteries, and especially of the cult of Mithras, which had embodied many ideas and ceremonies that are also met with in Christianity. Continue reading

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Salve Tores

Art - Art And Art History 253 with Bent at Washington and Lee University - StudyBlueHistory of the Devil
By Paul Carus, [1900]

p. 193
THE IDEA OF SALVATION IN GREECE AND ITALY.

ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ ποηροῦ.
Matt. vi. 14.

THE first century of [this] era is a time in which the fear of evil leads to the organisation of religious institutions having in view the atonement of sin and the redemption of the soul from the terrors of hell.

The ideas evil, sin, hell, salvation, and immortal life were familiar to the Greek mind even before the days of Plato, but were still mixed up with the traditional mythology. When philosophers began to wage war against the gross idolatry of Greek polytheism, a fermentation set in which prepared the Greek nation for the reception of Christianity. We say “prepared,” but we might just as well say that it resulted in the formation of the Christian Church as an institution to deliver mankind from evil.

The fear of punishment in the life to come led in the days of savagery to human sacrifices as a vicarious atonement. This barbarous practice was abandoned in the progress of civilisation by a substitution of animal victims. But the idea lingered in the minds of the people and was retained in Christianity, where, Continue reading

Greek Aiacus

king minos greek mythologyJudges of the Dead

RHADAMANTHYS, MINOS and AIAKOS (Aeacus) were the judges of the dead, three demi-god ministers of Haides. They were originally mortal men, sons of the god Zeus, who were granted their station in death as a reward for establishing law and order on earth.

Individually, Aiakos was guardian of the keys of Haides and judge of the men of Europe, Rhadamanthys the lord of Elysion (Elysium) and judge of the men of Asia, and Minos the judge of the third and final vote. According to some Triptolemos was a fourth judge who presided over the souls of Initiates of the Mysteries.

The name Aiakos was derived from the Greek words aiaktos and aiazô, “wailing” and “lamentation.” The etymology of the other names is obscure.

The mortal lives of the three judges is not detailed on this page only their role in the afterlife.

ENCYCLOPEDIA Continue reading

An Aiacid

Aeacus

Aeacus and Telamon by Jean-Michel Moreau le Jeune.

Aeacus (or Aiacos; Greek: Αἰακός) was a mythological king of the island of Aegina in the Saronic Gulf.

Aeacus was the son of Zeus and Aegina, a daughter of the river-god Asopus.  He was the father of Peleus, Telamon and Phocus and was the grandfather of Achilles (son of Peleus) and Ajax (son of Telemon).

Mythology
Aeacus was born on the island of Oenone or Oenopia, where Aegina had been carried by Zeus to secure her from the anger of her parents; afterward, this island became known as Aegina. Some stories related that, at the time when Aeacus was born, Aegina was not inhabited, and that Zeus either changed the ants (μύρμηκες) of the island into the men (Myrmidons) over whom Aeacus ruled, or he made the men grow up out of the earth. Ovid, on the other hand, Continue reading

Confusing Anubis (Anpu)

Image result for tehutiGreek Story of Anpu

Nephthys gave birth to a son called Anpu, or Anubis, and that his father was, according to some, Set; from another point of view he was the son of Ra.

[He] was the jackal god, and he was associated with the dead because the jackal was generally seen prowling about the tombs. His worship is very ancient, and there is no doubt that even the earliest times his cult was general in Egypt; it is probable that it is older than that of Osiris.

In the text of Unas {line 70 he is associated with the Eye of Horus, and his duty as the guide of the dead in the Underworld on their way to Osiris was well defined, even at the remote period when this composition was written, from we read, Unas standeth with the Spirits, get thee onwards, Anubis, into “Amenti {the Underworld, onwards, onwards to Osiris.”

In the lines that follow we see that Anubis is mentioned in connection with Horus, Set, [Tehuti], Sep, and Khent-an-maati. From another passage of the same text we find {line 207 ff that the hand, arms, belly, and legs of the deceased are identified with Temu, but his face is said to be in the form of that of Anubis. The localities in which Anubis was especially worshipped are Abt, the Papyrus Swamps, Sep, Re-au, Heru-ti, Ta-hetchet, Saint, {Lycopolis, Sekhem, {Letopolis, etc. Continue reading

Star In the Sky

Related image
The Wedding of Astrology and Kabbalah: Stars and Spheres

The following is an excerpt from Cosmic Navigator by Gahl Sasson:

The author of Sefer Yetzirah —tradition suggests it was Abraham, the first mono- theist of the Old Testament—provides precise associations between the zodiac signs and the Hebrew letters, yoking astrology to the sacred letters of the Torah. This manuscript details how God deployed the archetypal energies of the ten-sphered Kabbalistic Tree of Life and the twenty-two Hebrew letters to create the universe (see chapter 5).

The Midrash, a collection of Jewish myths and legends, tells us that King Solomon wore a magical ring engraved with Hebrew letters that afforded him the power to speak with animals. Since the word zodiac in Greek means “the wheel of animals,” one can say that King Solomon’s capacity to converse with animals referred to his ability to speak the language of the Continue reading

Book of Silence

Walking on Water (WoW!): Considering the Subject of SilenceFrom Book of Silence – Sepher Hash’tikah
by Reb Yakov Leib HaKohain, DONMEH WEST

 

“In seeking Wisdom, the first stage is silence.” — Rabbi Solomon ibn Gabriol (11th Century)

To begin with, there are two Silences and not one: There is the Silence of the Mouth and, in addition, the Silence of the Mind. The former does not necessarily accompany the latter, but the latter always accompanies the former. That is, one can be silent “in-the-mouth” while not, at the same time, also being silent “in-the-mind.” On the other hand, one who is silent “in-the-mind” is, at the same time, always silent in-the-mouth. Thus, there are three types of Lomaidim (Hebrew = “Learners”):

  • THE FOOL: Silent neither in the Mouth nor Mind
  • THE HEARING IMPAIRED: Silent in the Mouth but not the Mind
  • THE LISTENER: Silent in the Mouth and the Mind

Of the “fool,” Buddhism says, “A fool is like a spoon: it can sit in a bowl of soup forever and never taste it.” And in much the same way, the Talmud teaches: Continue reading