Category Archives: World

Queen Bilikisu Sungbo

Sungbo EredoA Brief History Of Bilikisu Sungbo – The Powerful Woman Who Is Believed To Have Commissioned The Great Walls Of Eredo

By Woman.NG, February 8, 2017

The story of Bilikisu Sungbo is one that draws the attention of both locals and foreigners to a village called Oke Eri in Ijebu Ode, Ogun state. Pilgrims from all over the world have been said to come to Oke Eri village where they believe Bilikisu Sungbo is buried.

The Sungbo Eredo  is a system of defensive walls and ditches said to have been commisioned by Bilikisu who was believed to be a wealthy queen and complexly built in 1000 CE. Although, it has been covered by forest, it was described as Africa’s largest single monument, with more earth and rock used to make the wall than was used in the Great Pyramid. Continue reading

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Saving Bull (2)

Duomo di Monreale | Art and FaithHistory of the Devil
By Paul Carus, [1900]

THE IDEA OF SALVATION IN GREECE AND ITALY.

Part 1 Here

In the days of Augustus and his successors the people were taught to expect salvation, the dispensation of justice, protection, peace, and prosperity from the emperor; and just as we have to-day monarchies where the king regards himself as the Anointed One by the grace of God and a representative of God on earth, so the Roman emperor arrogated to himself divine honors, and even philosophers such as Seneca did not hesitate to acknowledge the claim. The practical significance of this view is that the government should be regarded with religious awe, and its officers, as such, are divine. The Christians who refused to worship before the emperor’s images must have appeared to the Romans of those days as anarchists and rebels. But when Nero committed matricide and other most outrageous crimes, the belief in the emperor’s divinity dwindled away, and the idea of the suffering God, the man who died on the cross because he would rather be than appear just, gained ground among the people.

Christianity was not the only religion which promised deliverance from evil through the saving power of blood and by means of a vicarious atonement, for we know of the immortality-promising mysteries, and especially of the cult of Mithras, which had embodied many ideas and ceremonies that are also met with in Christianity. Continue reading

Salve Tores

Art - Art And Art History 253 with Bent at Washington and Lee University - StudyBlueHistory of the Devil
By Paul Carus, [1900]

p. 193
THE IDEA OF SALVATION IN GREECE AND ITALY.

ἀλλὰ ῥῦσαι ἡμᾶς ἀπὸ τοῦ ποηροῦ.
Matt. vi. 14.

THE first century of [this] era is a time in which the fear of evil leads to the organisation of religious institutions having in view the atonement of sin and the redemption of the soul from the terrors of hell.

The ideas evil, sin, hell, salvation, and immortal life were familiar to the Greek mind even before the days of Plato, but were still mixed up with the traditional mythology. When philosophers began to wage war against the gross idolatry of Greek polytheism, a fermentation set in which prepared the Greek nation for the reception of Christianity. We say “prepared,” but we might just as well say that it resulted in the formation of the Christian Church as an institution to deliver mankind from evil.

The fear of punishment in the life to come led in the days of savagery to human sacrifices as a vicarious atonement. This barbarous practice was abandoned in the progress of civilisation by a substitution of animal victims. But the idea lingered in the minds of the people and was retained in Christianity, where, Continue reading

Greek Aiacus

king minos greek mythologyJudges of the Dead

RHADAMANTHYS, MINOS and AIAKOS (Aeacus) were the judges of the dead, three demi-god ministers of Haides. They were originally mortal men, sons of the god Zeus, who were granted their station in death as a reward for establishing law and order on earth.

Individually, Aiakos was guardian of the keys of Haides and judge of the men of Europe, Rhadamanthys the lord of Elysion (Elysium) and judge of the men of Asia, and Minos the judge of the third and final vote. According to some Triptolemos was a fourth judge who presided over the souls of Initiates of the Mysteries.

The name Aiakos was derived from the Greek words aiaktos and aiazô, “wailing” and “lamentation.” The etymology of the other names is obscure.

The mortal lives of the three judges is not detailed on this page only their role in the afterlife.

ENCYCLOPEDIA Continue reading

NTR THT

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Tehuti

A very well known image of Tehuti, the ibis headed Black man.

Name in Medu Neter
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Major spiritual center: Khmun
Symbol: The papyrus scroll
Parents: None, thought to be self created, around the same time as Ma’at
Consort: Ma’at, Seshat

Tehuti (also Djehuti), the lord of Khemmenu, self created, to whom non had given birth, is the Neter responsible for teaching the world to write and record information with the Medu Neter system. From many Funerary texts, it’s known that Tehuti was the Neter of all the arts and sciences, that he was the “lord of books,” and the “scribe of the Neteru”, and “Mighty in speech”.

Early information

From the Pyramid Texts it’s known that Tehuti was in service to deceased kings. His service was eagerly awaited by the by the souls waiting to join the realm of the Ancestors. People waited for him because it was with him that Ma’at weighed their heart against their past actions. Continue reading

Dender And Light

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Mountain and Caves

Grain in the mountain hieroglyph shape Mountain

Mountain (djew)

The hieroglyphic sign for “mountain” depicted to peaks with a valley running between them. This image approximated the hills that rose up on either side of the Nile valley.

Although the djew hieroglyph did portray the mountain ranges the Egyptians saw in their everyday lives, it also was a visualization of their cosmic beliefs. Symbolically, the “mountain” was an image of the universal mountain whose two peaks were imagined to hold up the sky. The eastern peak was called Bakhu, to the west was Manu. The ends of this great mountain were guarded by two lions who were called Aker. Aker was a protector of the the sun as it rose and set each day. Continue reading