Category Archives: World

Sophia’s Cat

Her Em Akhet and Khephren pyramidThe Mystery of the Great Sphinx

By Brian Haughton, 2011 [Edited]

Buried for most of its life in the desert sand, an air of mystery has always surrounded the Great Sphinx, causing speculation about its age and purpose, method of construction, concealed chambers, role in prophecy, and relationship to the equally mysterious pyramids. Much of this theorizing is to the despair of Egyptologists and archaeologists.

The Mystery of the Great Sphinx
Facing the rising sun, the Great Sphinx is located on the Giza plateau, about 10 km west of Cairo, on the west bank of the Nile River. Later Egyptian rulers worshipped it as an aspect of the sun god, calling it Her-Em-Akhet (“Horus of the Horizon”). The Sphinx sits in part of the necropolis of ancient Memphis, the seat of power for the pharaohs, a short distance from three large pyramids – the Great Pyramid of Khufu (Cheops), Khafre (Chephren) and Menkaura (Mycerinus). Continue reading

Guarding Heru

Related imageHer-em-Akhet

From World Afropedia (Edited)

Heru-em-Akhut (Her-em-Akhet) is a Khemetan term that roughly translates to Heru in the Horizon. It is a Monument which depicts the head of an Afu-Ra-Kan [Afrikan] atop the body of a lion, known today as the ‘Great Sphinx of Giza’. Heru-em-Akhut was later used as the model for the hellenic “Harmakhus”.

Physical Description and Controversy

Throughout history, people have been perplexed by the majestic presence of Heru-em-Akhut. At over 66-feet high, 20-feet wide and 241-feet long, Heru-em-Akhut stands as the largest monolithic structure in the world. Its dimensions are as massive as its builders’ achievement–an achievement so great that, when later witnessed by european explorers, they concluded that a reality of it being built by Humans could not be possible.

Though it protected the horizon in Khemt, and was decorated wall-to-wall with Netjer Medu, european “scholars” have searched vigorously for its builders in some “ancient lost civilization”, or “proofs” to lend its fashioning to extraterrestrial ‘super-beings’. Continue reading

Book of Silence

Walking on Water (WoW!): Considering the Subject of SilenceFrom Book of Silence – Sepher Hash’tikah
by Reb Yakov Leib HaKohain, DONMEH WEST

 

“In seeking Wisdom, the first stage is silence.” — Rabbi Solomon ibn Gabriol (11th Century)

To begin with, there are two Silences and not one: There is the Silence of the Mouth and, in addition, the Silence of the Mind. The former does not necessarily accompany the latter, but the latter always accompanies the former. That is, one can be silent “in-the-mouth” while not, at the same time, also being silent “in-the-mind.” On the other hand, one who is silent “in-the-mind” is, at the same time, always silent in-the-mouth. Thus, there are three types of Lomaidim (Hebrew = “Learners”):

  • THE FOOL: Silent neither in the Mouth nor Mind
  • THE HEARING IMPAIRED: Silent in the Mouth but not the Mind
  • THE LISTENER: Silent in the Mouth and the Mind

Of the “fool,” Buddhism says, “A fool is like a spoon: it can sit in a bowl of soup forever and never taste it.” And in much the same way, the Talmud teaches: Continue reading

Mountain and Caves

Grain in the mountain hieroglyph shape Mountain

Mountain (djew)

The hieroglyphic sign for “mountain” depicted to peaks with a valley running between them. This image approximated the hills that rose up on either side of the Nile valley.

Although the djew hieroglyph did portray the mountain ranges the Egyptians saw in their everyday lives, it also was a visualization of their cosmic beliefs. Symbolically, the “mountain” was an image of the universal mountain whose two peaks were imagined to hold up the sky. The eastern peak was called Bakhu, to the west was Manu. The ends of this great mountain were guarded by two lions who were called Aker. Aker was a protector of the the sun as it rose and set each day. Continue reading

Prime Encryption

 Primes, Modular Arithmetic, and Public Key Cryptography
(April 15, 2004)

 Introduction

Every cipher we have worked with up to this point has been what is called a symmetric key cipher, in that the key with which you encipher a plaintext message is the same as the key with which you decipher a ciphertext message. As we have discussed from time to time, this leads to several problems. One of these is that, somehow, two people who want to use such a system must privately and secretly agree on a secret key. This is quite difficult if they are a long distance apart (it requires either a trusted courier or an expensive trip), and is wholly impractical if there is a whole network of people (for example, an army) who need to communicate. Even the sophisticated Enigma machine required secret keys. In fact, it was exactly the key distribution problem that led to the initial successful attacks on the Enigma machine.

However, in the late 1970’s, several people came up with a remarkable new way to solve the Continue reading

Prime Arithmetic Progression

Prime Phyllotaxis Spirals | Maxwell's DemonPrime Arithmetic Progression

By MathWorld

An arithmetic progression of primes is a set of primes of the form p_1+kd for fixed p_1 and d and consecutive k, i.e., {p_1,p_1+d,p_1+2d,...}. For example, 199, 409, 619, 829, 1039, 1249, 1459, 1669, 1879, 2089 is a 10-term arithmetic progression of primes with difference 210.

It had long been conjectured that there exist arbitrarily long sequences of primes in arithmetic progression (Guy 1994). As early as 1770, Lagrange and Waring investigated how large the common difference of an arithmetic progression of n primes must be. In 1923, Hardy and Littlewood (1923) made a very general conjecture known as the k-tuple conjecture about the distribution of prime constellations, which includes the hypothesis that there exist infinitely long prime arithmetic progressions as a special case. Important additional theoretical progress was subsequently made by van der Corput (1939), who proved than there are infinitely many triples of primes in arithmetic progression, and Heath-Brown (1981), who proved that there are infinitely many four-term progressions consisting of three primes and a number that is either a prime or semiprime. Continue reading

Arithmetic Progression of Primes

Why are there infinitely many prime numbers?Top 20 Arithmetic Progression of Primes

by Chris Caldwell

The Prime Pages keeps a list of the 5000 largest known primes, plus a few each of certain selected archivable forms and classes. These forms are defined in this collection’s home page. This page is about one of those forms.

Definitions and Notes

Are there infinitely many primes in most arithmetic progressions?  Certainly not if the common difference has a prime factor in common with one of the terms (for example: 6, 9, 12, 15, …).  In 1837, Dirichlet proved that in all other cases the answer was yes:

Dirichlet’s Theorem on Primes in Arithmetic Progressions
If a and b are relatively prime positive integers, then the arithmetic progression a, a+b, a+2b, a+3b, … contains infinitely many primes.

Continue reading