Category Archives: Language

Kleo Patra – the Key

cleopatraDefense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

See part 1 – Ptah Ra Pater

Cleopatra

Let us discuss Cleopatra, the feminine aspect of this subject matter. We talked about the Father but what about the Mother? You find this marvelous archetype also in ancient Egypt. When people talk about Cleopatra, they always remember the Cleopatra who was with Mark Anthony, but they ignore that there were many Cleopatra long before her in ancient Egypt. A Cleopatra is a vestal of the temple. They are what we call in this day in age “nuns.”

Cleopatra derives from the Greek name Κλεοπατρα, Κλεος-Πτα (Kleopatra) which means “glory of Ptah, the father” derived from (κλεος – kleos) “glory.” This is combined with πατρος, patros, “of the father (Πτα – Ptah)” or Κλεος-Ποτήρ “glory of the cup” (ποτήρ – potēr). The cup, the yoni, the feminine sexual organ, is the Holy Grail. Thus, Kleo-poter is Cleopatra.  Potēr means cup, chalice, grail, the sexual yoni. When you say Cleopatra, you are indicating the feminine sexual force of God. This is why the Cleopatras were vestals in ancient Egypt.

  • Kleopatra: “keys to the father,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + patros [πατρος] father
  • Kleopatra, Kleopetra: “Keystone,” from kleis [κλείς] “keys” + petra [πέτρᾳ] “stone”

Thus, Kleopatra symbolizes the keystone, which in the previous lecture the speaker was explaining. The keystone of the temple, the cornerstone of th Continue reading

Ptah Ra Pater

ptahDefense for Spiritual Warfare
The Prayer of the Lord

Gnostic Teachings, 2013 [Excerpt edited]

The graphic is of the African symbol Ptah, which as an archetype was very active in ancient KMT (now Egypt). We find Ptah in the Bible as Tso-Phtah Paneach צפתה פענח [Genesis 41:45]. Thus, we are also going to explain what Ptah symbolizes. That is why at the bottom of this powerful symbol or archetype we wrote the quotation of Hosea chapter 11, verse 1.

All of the prayers and wisdom that we find in Christianity, Islam and Judaism, emerge from the same land: KMT. When we study the African archetypes, which are very profound, Gnostics do not fall into the mistake of thinking like the ignoramuses who think that these are “idols.” We know what idols are, and what archetypes are.

The Prayer of the Lord, called in Latin “Pater Noster,” is powerful when we recite it in Latin, given the fact that Latin is a Romanic root language of different romance languages, such as Spanish, French, Italian, and Portuguese. We also find Latin words in the English language. Continue reading

Titular Bible

I AM MAYA…

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Loa Veve

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MtoW of Adinkra Symbols

Adinkra Index

See ABDE

See FGHK

mate masieMATE MASIE -“what I hear, I keep” wisdom, knowledge, prudence
Ntesi-Matemasi symbolizes wisdom and knowledge. “Nyasa bun mu nne mate masie masie.”

me ware woME WARE WO -“I shall marry you” commitment, perseverance Continue reading

FGHK of Adinkra Symbols

Adinkra Symbols

Tradition has it that Adinkra, a famous king of Gyaman (now part of Cote d’Ivoire) angered the Asantehene, Bonsu-Panyin, by trying to copy the Golden Stool. Adinkra was defeated and slain in an ensuing war. It has been suggested that the art of adinkra came from Gyaman. It is also significant that adinkra means farewell, or good-bye, hence the use of the special cloth on funeral occasions (eyie), to say good-bye to the departed.

Adinkra aduru (adinkra medicine) is the stuff used in the stamping process. It is prepared by boiling the bark of badie together with iron slag. Originally the printing was done on a cotton piece lying on the ground. Today, raised platforms with sack coverings act as the printing table. The designs, cut on pieces of calabash with pieces of wood attached for handling, are dipped into the adinkera aduru, then stamped onto the cloth. Adinkra cloth is not meant Continue reading

ABDE of Adinkra Symbols

Adinkra Cloth from afroetic.com

African Symbols: Adinkra

The Adinkra symbols were originally designed by “Asante” Craftsment of Ghana, West Africa.

The symbols embody non-verbal communicative and aesthetic values, as well as the way of life of the people who designed them.

The symbols are usually printed on cotton fabric to produce “Adinkra cloths,” which may be worn on such celebrative occasions as child naming, community durbars and funerary rituals.

Each of the symbols has its Asante name and an accompanying literal English translation.


ADINKRA INDEX

ADINKRAHENE – “chief of adinkra symbols” greatness, charisma, leadership
This symbol is said to have played an inspiring role in the designing of other symbols. it signifies the importance of playing a leadership role.
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