Tag Archives: Asia

Shinto Deities

KURODA TOSHIO
Shinto in the History of Japanese Religion
Translated by JAMES C . DOBBINS and SUZANNE GAY

II. The Significance of Shinto Deities in the Ancient Period

In the previous section the word Shinto was analyzed to show how it was used and what it meant in ancient times. Now it is necessary to consider the institutional significance and place of kami in Japan during that period, especially as evidenced in the jingiryõ laws and in Shinto-Buddhist syncreticism.

The jingiryõ is a set of laws of ancient Japan which instituted ceremonies to the kami. Needless to say, these laws include only those rites which had state sponsorship, but they nonetheless represent a fair sampling of the ceremonies current at that time. In brief the jingiryõ laws cover the following topics: Continue reading

Sharing Shinto

KURODA TOSHIO
Shinto in the History of Japanese Religion
Translated by JAMES C . DOBBINS and SUZANNE GAY

I. Shinto in the Nihon shoki

The word Shinto is commonly taken to mean Japan’s indigenous religion and to have had that meaning from fairly early times. It is difficult, however, to find a clear-cut example of the word Shinto used in such a way in early writings. The intellectual historian Tsuda Sõkichi has studied the occurrences of the word Shinto in early Japanese literature and has divided its meaning into the following six categories:

1) “religious beliefs found in indigenous customs passed down in Japan, including superstitious beliefs”; 2) “the authority, power, activity, or deeds of a kami, the status of kami, being a kami, or the kami itself”; 3) concepts and teachings concerning kami; 4) Continue reading

Shinto

RELIGION; Native roots and foreign influence
Japan Fact Sheet

The history of religion in Japan is a long process of mutual influence between religious traditions. In contrast to Europe, where Christianity overwhelmed local pagan traditions, the indigenous religion Shinto has continued as a part of the lives of the people from the earliest days of an organized Japanese state up to modern times.

When Buddhism was introduced to Japan in the 6th century, Shinto and Buddhist beliefs began to interact. This is the defining characteristic of Japanese religion. The most striking example of this interaction is the theory of honji suijaku, in which Shinto kami were seen as the incarnations of Buddhist deities. Continue reading

Naga

The Nagas
From Khandro Website

The word Naga comes from the Sanskrit, and nag is still the word for snake, especially the cobra, in most of the languages of India.

When we come upon the word in Buddhist writings, it is not always clear whether the term refers to a cobra, an elephant (perhaps this usage relates to its snake-like trunk, or the pachyderm’s association with forest-dwelling peoples of north-eastern India called Nagas), or even a mysterious person of nobility.

It is a term used for unseen beings associated with water and fluid energy, and also with persons having powerful animal-like qualities or conversely, an impressive animal with human qualities. Continue reading

Rahu and Ketu

Rahu & Ketu
By C. Hartley, 1997

According to the Sanskrit epic poem, the Mahabharata, the Hindu gods decided to mix up a batch of soma, the elixir of immortality. The gods were to drink the elixir to become immortal. The gods needed help from the demons to stir up the oceans to produce the elixir.

Out of the churning oceans the Sun, Moon, many goddess, and magic things were produced along with the soma. Vishnu took charge of distributing the freshly made soma to the gods but while it was being passed out the demons started battling with the gods for a taste of the elixir and in the confusion one of the demons, Rahu, disguised himself as a god and drank some of the elixir. Continue reading

Serpent Cult

Tracing the origins of the Serpent CultLoki’s brood; Hel, Fenrir and Jörmungandr. By Emil Doepler, 1905

Tracing the origins of the Serpent Cult
By Katrina Sisowath, 2014

In mythology, the serpent symbolises fertility and procreation, wisdom, death, and resurrection (due to the shedding of its skin, which is not akin to rebirth), and in the earliest schools of mysticism, the symbol of ‘The Word’ was the serpent. The ‘light’ that appeared was metaphorically defined as a serpent called ‘Kundalini’, coiled at the base of the spine to remain dormant in an unawakened person. Divinity or awakening one’s Godhood and latent abilities came with the rituals and teachings brought by the serpent people.

To understand them, we must look at the original ‘serpents’.  In China, it was a male and female pair Continue reading

Kali

Kali the Goddess: Gentle Mother, Fierce Warrior
By Madhuri Guin

O Kali, my mother full of bliss! Enchantress of the almighty Shiva!
In Thy delirious joy Thou dancest, clapping Thy hands together!
Thou art the Mover of all that move, and we are but Thy helpless toys.
— Ramakrishna Paramhans

Kali is one of the most well known and worshipped Hindu Goddesses. The name Kali is derived from the Hindu word that means “time”, and that also means “black”.

Kali in Hinduism, is a manifestation of the Divine Mother, which represents the female principle. Frequently, those not comprehending her many roles in life call Kali the goddess of destruction. She destroys only to recreate, and what she destroys is sin, ignorance and decay. She is equated with the eternal night, is the transcendent power of time, and is the consort of the god Shiva. Continue reading

Symbol Thievery

http://themindunleashed.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/all-seeing.jpg The All-Seeing Eye: Sacred Origins of a Hijacked Symbol
By The Mind Unleashed, August 11 2014

The all-seeing eye is a powerful esoteric symbol which is widely misunderstood and misused today; few know what it originally stood for. It was originally symbolic of a higher spiritual power or God, a watchful caretaker of humanity or an awakened spiritual part within. But these days it has quite different associations.

Today the all-seeing eye is more likely to be seen as an “Illuminati” symbol of control and surveillance by elites who to a large degree run the show on this planet at this time. This is because, over time, dark sinister forces have taken over esoteric symbols that for thousands of years were used to convey Continue reading

Hiromasa’s Flute

Devil Flute - ebayPrince Hiromasa and the Devil’s flute
By Doc, 2013

FlutesThere’s an old legend from Japan concerning Prince Hiromasa (918-980), which is reminiscent of the European and American South stories about meeting Satan at a lonely crossroads.

Prince Hiromasa was walking one moonlit night at Suzaku Gate in Kyoto. He was playing the flute while he walked. Then he heard another flute harmonizing with his. The Prince searched out the player and found him in the upper story of the gate. Having exchanged flutes, the two played music together right through the night.

Continue reading

Rahu and Ketu Kala Sarpa

nodes - starworlds12 Types of Kalsarpa Yoga in Astrology
From Hindu Devotional Blog

The person who has Kala Sarpa Yoga in his horoscope will suffer from various problems in life. Hence Kala Sarpa Yogam or Kalsarpa Yoga is regarded as a deadly yoga in Hindu astrology. Kala Sarpa Yoga is formed when all the planets are hemmed between the Navagraha Planets Lord Rahu and Lord Ketu in one’s horoscope.

There are mainly 12 types of Kala Sarpa Yoga. Below are the details of the twelve Kala Sarpa Yogas and the positives and negatives of the yogas.

Anant Kalsarpa Yoga Continue reading

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