Tag Archives: Tree of Death

Adar Moloch

ADRAMMELECH
From Jewish Encyclopedia

—Biblical Data:

1. Mentioned in II Kings, xvii. 31, as a god of Sepharvaim, which until recently was supposed to be the Hebrew name for the Babylonian city Sippar. After the inhabitants of Sepharvaim had been deported to Samaria (II Kings, xvii. 24; Isa. xxxvi. 19) by Sargon, king of Assyria, they continued to worship their gods Adrammelech and Anammelech, accompanying their rites with the sacrifice of children by fire.

There was, however, no Assyrian or Babylonian god bearing the name Adrammelech, although, according to some scholars, the form of the word, if it be regarded as Assyrian, points to a supposed original “Adar-malik” (see 2). Continue reading

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Zohar – 8. Adrammelech

Adrammelech

Smith’s Bible Dictionary
Adrammelech
(splendor of the king)

The name of an idol introduced into Samaria by the colonists from Sepharvaim. (2 Kings 17:31) He was worshipped with rites resembling those of Molech, children being burnt in his honor.

Adrammelech was probably the male power of the sun, and ANAMMELECH, who is mentioned with Adrammelech as a companion god, the female power of the sun.

Son of the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who, with his brother Sharezer, murdered their father in the temple of Nisroch at Nineveh, after the failure of the Assyrian attack on Continue reading

Ba’al the Bug

BeelzebubBritish Dictionary definitions for Beelzebub
noun
1. (Old Testament) a god of the Philistines (2 Kings 1:2)
2. Satan or any devil or demon

Word Origin and History for Beelzebub
O.E. Belzebub, Philistine god worshipped at Ekron (2 Kings i.2), from L., used in Vulgate for N.T. Gk. beelzeboub, from Heb. ba’al-z’bub “lord of the flies,” from ba’al “lord” + z’bhubh “fly.” By later Christian writers often taken as another name for “Satan,” though Milton [Paradise Lost] made him one of the fallen angels, second only to Satan in power.

Beelzebub in the Bible
(Gr. form Beel’zebul), the name given to Satan, and Continue reading

Dark Lilith

Lilith Tempting Adam and Eve – Notre Dame Cathedral

The Case for Lilith
By Mark Wayne Biggs
[edited]

Of all the Jewish myths, the story of Lilith is undoubtedly the most fascinating. According to her legend Lilith was the first wife of Adam. But she was a failed mate who rebelled against her husband and fled from the garden to become the mother of demons. Her legend has influenced more modern monster mythologies than any other Jewish myth. Continue reading

Zohar – 10. Nahema

Nahema - barbies_14 - akNaamah (demon)

Naamah or Na’amah (Hebrew: נעמה‎) is a legendary demonic creature, the mother of divination. How she became a demon is unclear.

Etymology

Naamah comes from Hebrew: נעם‎ naim and means pleasant.

The meaning of her name is argued among Hebrew scholars; it refers either to her virtuous nature (“pleasing” to God (YHVH)) or to a penchant for idolatry (singing “pleasant” songs to pagan idols). Continue reading

Shells of Death

Qlippoth MOCOn the Nature of the Qlippoth
From My Occult Circle

The following chapter will briefly describe each Sephiroth as well as the nature of its equivalent Qliphoth. The intention is to foster a deeper understanding of how the respective divine and demonic forces are related to each other. Bringing together the nature of each Sephiroth and the literal translation of the respective demonic name might proof to be a valuable key for unlocking the dark side of the tree.

KETHER – THAUMIEL

Kether (Crown) represents the first and purest emanation of the Divine. Kether also represent the first moment of creation. It marks the moment Continue reading

Tree of Death

klippoth TIQliphoth

The Qliphoth/Qelippot or Kelipot (Heb. קליפות) – literally “Peels”, “Shells” or “Husks”, from singular: קליפה Qliphah/Kelipah “Husk”) – are the representation of evil or impure spiritual forces in Jewish mysticism. The realm of evil is also termed ‘Sitra Achra/Ahra’ (Aramaic סטרא אחרא, the “Other Side” opposite holiness) in Kabbalah texts.

Kabbalah

In the Kabbalah, the Kelipot are metaphorical “shells” surrounding holiness. They are spiritual obstacles receiving their existence from God only in an external, rather than internal manner. Divinity in Judaism connotes revelation of God’s true unity, while the shells Continue reading

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