Tag Archives: Demons

Rahu and Ketu

Rahu & Ketu
By C. Hartley, 1997

According to the Sanskrit epic poem, the Mahabharata, the Hindu gods decided to mix up a batch of soma, the elixir of immortality. The gods were to drink the elixir to become immortal. The gods needed help from the demons to stir up the oceans to produce the elixir.

Out of the churning oceans the Sun, Moon, many goddess, and magic things were produced along with the soma. Vishnu took charge of distributing the freshly made soma to the gods but while it was being passed out the demons started battling with the gods for a taste of the elixir and in the confusion one of the demons, Rahu, disguised himself as a god and drank some of the elixir. Continue reading

Demons and the Seven Sins

Daemonary
From Liza Phoenix

The Seven Deadly Sins

Pride: Lucifer: A great angel cast into Hell; also known as the light bringer, the bearer of light, and the morning star; inspires pride and rebellion. From Latin Lucifer. bef.1000. (Islamic, Judeo-Christian, Satanic)

Sloth: Belphegor: Demon of indifference; inspires extreme laziness and spiritual apathy. From Hebrew Baal-Peor, Bel-Phegor. (Judeo-Christian)

Gluttony: Beelzebub: The prince of demons; the lord of the flies; inspires gluttony, unholy desire, jealousy, war, and murder. From Hebrew Ba’al-Z’bub, Ba’al-Z’bul. bef.1100. (Islamic, Judeo-Christian, Satanic) Continue reading

Jinn Den

Iblis

From The Vengeful Djinn by Rosemary Ellen Guiley and Philip J. Imbrogno, and The Encyclopedia of Demons & Demonology and The Encyclopedia of Angels by Rosemary Ellen Guiley.

In Islam, Iblis serves the same function as the Devil, tempting humans to make the wrong spiritual choices. The name Iblis means “despair” or “he who is despaired.” Iblis is also the chief and father of the Djinn. He can assume any form.

Iblis is mentioned nine times in the Qu’ran; seven of the references concern his fall from God’s grace. His other name, Shaytan (Shaitan), or “the deceiver,” , is used in context of his rebellion against God. Sura al-Kahf 18.50 in the Qu’ran states that Iblis “was one of the djinn, and he broke the command his Lord.” As a djinni, Iblis was created by God of smokeless fire. Suras 7.12 and 38.76 refer to his creation from fire.

Why Iblis fell from grace
Continue reading

Most Arrogant Jinn

Iblis

The spirit Iblis is a Jinn, which are “mischievous” spirits of earth who reside in a universe parallel to the human world while maintaining the ability to interact in both realms. The Jinn are mortal and powerful spirits whose purpose is to tempt and possess (majnun) humans by creating illusions (ghurur) that familiarize mankind with “the eternal fire” of hell.

The Jinn in their natural state are too horrific for mankind to see, they are highly intelligent, they can Continue reading

al-Iblis

Iblis
By Alan G. Hefner

Iblis is the name for the devil in the Qur’an. Although the term “devil” comes from the Greek diabolos, the Muslims derived the name from the Arabic, balasa, “he despaired,” which can be interpreted “despaired of the mercy of God” but he is also al-Shairan, Satan, and “the enemy of God.” The latter aspect of Satan is a commonly shared belief of both Muslims and Christians.

According to one tradition, when Allah ordered the angels to bow down to the newly created man, Adam, Iblis refused to do so because he, being made of fire, thought himself superior to a creature made of earth. He continues tempting humans, especially through the whisper (waswas, “he Continue reading

Iblis the Angel

Qur’an Incoherence and Contradiction
Is Satan an Angel or a Jinn?
Analyzing the Quran’s Confusing Statements
By Sam Shamoun

The Quran, in many citations, portrays Satan or Iblis as an angel:

And (remember) when We said to the angels: “Prostrate yourselves before Adam.” And they prostrated except Iblis (Satan), he refused and was proud and was one of the disbelievers (disobedient to Allah). S. 2:34

And (remember) when your Lord said to the angels: “I am going to create a man (Adam) from sounding clay of altered black smooth mud. So, when I have fashioned him completely and breathed into him (Adam) the soul which I created for him, then fall (you) down prostrating yourselves unto him.” So, the angels prostrated themselves, all of them together. Except Iblis Continue reading

Iblis

Iblis

In Islam, the Devil is known as Iblīs (Arabic: إبليس‎, plural: ابالسة abālisah) or Shayṭān (Arabic: شيطان‎, plural: شياطين shayāṭīn). In Islam, Iblis is a jinni who refused to bow to Adam.

The primary characteristic of the Devil, besides hubris, is that he has no power other than the power to cast evil suggestions into humans and jinn, although the Quran mentions appointing jinn to assist those who are far from God in a general context. “We made the evil ones friends (only) to those without faith.”

Namings and etymology

Iblis in Arabic verbal root balasa بَلَسَ, meaning ‘he despaired’; therefore, the meaning of Iblīs would be ‘he/it that causes despair’. Continue reading

Dem Demons – 2

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Part 1

Pre-Talmudic Demonology.

Upon pre-Talmudic demonology new light has been thrown by the “Testament of Solomon,” translated by Conybeare in “Jew. Quart. Rev.” (1898, xi. 1-45), a work which, notwithstanding many Christian interpolations, is of ancient Jewish origin and related to the “Book of Healing” (“Sefer Refu’ot”) ascribed to King Solomon (see Pes. iv. 9; Josephus, l.c.; Schürer, “Geseh.” iii. 300). In this “Testament” it is told that by the help of a magic ring with the seal of Pentalpha, Lilith-like vampires, Beelzebub, and all kinds of demons and unclean spirits were brought before Solomon, to whom they disclosed their secrets and told how they could be mastered. It contains incantations against certain diseases, and specifies the task allotted to each of the chief demons in the erection of the Temple.

The latter was a favorite theme of the Haggadists (Pesiḳ. R. vi.; Soṭah 48b; Giṭ. 68a). The later Haggadah ascribed to Moses this power to Continue reading

Dem Demons – 1

Death Cartoon in The Canadian MagazineDemonology
From Jewish Encyclopedia

Systematic knowledge concerning demons or evil spirits. Demons (Greek, δαίμονες or δαιμόνια; Hebrew, [Deut. xxxii. 17; Ps. cvi. 37] and [Lev. xvii. 7; II Chron. xi. 15; A. V. “devils”; Luther, “Feldgeister” and “Feldteufel”]; Aramaic, or rabbinical, and as spirits animating all elements of life and inhabiting all parts of the world, have their place in the primitive belief of all tribes and races. When certain deities rose to be the objects of regular worship and became the rulers of the powers of life, demons, or spirits, were subordinated to them. But inasmuch as they were still feared and occasionally worshiped by the populace, they became the objects of popular superstition. Continue reading

Pan’s Door Ajar

Pandora

In Greek mythology, Pandora (Greek: Πανδώρα, derived from πᾶν, pān, “all” and δῶρον, dōron, “gift”, thus “the all-endowed”, “the all-gifted” or “the all-giving”) was the first human woman created by the gods, specifically by Hephaestus and Athena on the instructions of Zeus. As Hesiod related, each god helped create her by giving her unique gifts. Zeus ordered Hephaestus to mold her out of earth as part of the punishment of humanity for Prometheus’ theft of the secret of fire, and all the gods joined in offering her “seductive gifts”. Her other name—inscribed against her figure on a white-ground kylix in the British Museum—is Anesidora, “she who sends up gifts” (up implying “from below” within the earth). Continue reading

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