Tag Archives: Buddhism

Jigoku – Japanese Hell

kyosai_4_Kawanabe Kysai PTJigoku

Jigoku,  in Japanese Buddhism, hell, a region popularly believed to be composed of a number of hot and cold regions located under the Earth.

Jigoku is ruled over by Emma-ō, the Japanese lord of death, corresponds to the Indian deity Yama. He judges the dead by consulting a register in which are entered all of their sins. The sinner is sent to one of the 16 regions of fire or ice assigned him by Emma-ō for a fixed period of time until the next rebirth, unless Continue reading

Ten Realms Ten Powers

Seven Deities Banishing AsuraDharma Realm
By Alan Koo

This is the general term for the “things”, noumenal or phenomenal. In Buddhism, there are ten states of existence, which are also called Ten Dharma Realms. Each Dharma realm has its own characteristics, and its existence is attributed to the retribution of the beings. These ten realms do not appear to be discrete in their forms, as their existence is virtually determined by the state of mind. Therefore, it is important to note that the ten Dharma realms are not beyond a single thought. Continue reading

Night Mara

Shakyamuni being tested by the Daughters and Children of Mara under the Bodhi tree.

MARA
By the Wanderling

Centuries ago the coming Buddha sat under the Bodhi-tree and vowed not to move until he learned to eradicate suffering, unfolding Anuttara Samyak Sambodhi, the Consumation of Incomparable Enlightenment. But Mara, the personification of evil, tried to usurp his plans by sending his three daughters Tanha (desire), Raga (lust), and Arati (aversion), to seduce him and break his concentration. However, the coming Buddha was too strong for Mara.

In Buddhism Mara is the lord of misfortune, sin, destruction and Death. Mara is the ruler of desire and Continue reading

Borobudur

Borobudur

Borobudur is a 9th-century Mahayana Buddhist Temple in Magelang, Central Java, Indonesia. The monument consists of six square platforms topped by three circular platforms, and is decorated with 2,672 relief panels and 504 Buddha statues. A main dome, located at the center of the top platform, is surrounded by 72 Buddha statues seated inside a perforated stupa. Continue reading

The Six Realms of Samsara

Hungry Ghost OMPFrom A Brief Description of the Bardo
by Thrangu Rinponche, Geshe Lharampa

Chapter One
An Introduction to the Bardo Teachings

It is said that human beings have a body, speech and mind. The body consists of flesh and blood while he mind is a collection of the eight consciousnesses and speech, a conjunction of the body and mind, is the creation of sound to communicate with others. Body and the mechanisms for speech are created in the mother’s womb, greatly develop at birth, and cease at death. The mind, however, is not created in the mother’s womb; it does not disappear like the body after death. Throughout beginningless time the mind has been habituated to its karmic tendencies. Through the force of grasping to a self, the mind enters the physical form in the mother womb at conception and this process is called “name and form’ in the twelve steps of interdependent origination. “Name” refers to sensations, identification, mental events and the consciousnesses, the four mental aggregates. “Form” refers to the first aggregate of form. Continue reading

Sixth Dalai Lama

Sixth Dalai LamaTSHANGS-DBYANGS-RGYA-MTSHO
Author: FANG CHAO-YING

Tshangs-dbyangs-rgya-mtsho 策養[倉洋]嘉錯 , Feb.11, 1683-1706, the Sixth Dalai Lama and poet, was born at Mon in southern Tibet. His full name was bLo-bzang-rig-hdsins (羅布藏仁青)-tshangs-dbyangs-rgya-mtsho.

The year before he was born the Fifth Dalai Lama had died. According to Tibetan law, the death of a Dalai Lama should be publicly announced, and high commissioners should then convene to select some new-born infant as the reincarnation of the deceased Lama. This infant is then educated in the monastery, Potala, and the Panchan Lama rules at the head of a body of regents, until the child comes of age. But this procedure was ignored in this instance as the Tipa (temporal administrator under the Dalai Lama), whose name was sDe-srid Sangsrgyas-rgya-mtsho, known in Continue reading

Buddhist Deities – The Five Dhyani Buddhas

In the top centre sits Vajradhara, flanked by Gedun Drukpa, the first Dalai Lama (left) and his disciple Panchen Zangpo Tashi (right). In the bottom corner are two of the great stupas, on the left Budhgaya (India) and on the right Borobudur (Indonesia).

The Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhist Pantheon

The principal beings are the five Dhyani Buddhas – the esoteric meditation Buddhas of the five colors found in The Tibetan Book of the Dead and other sources. The deities are not Buddhist Gods, but rather different aspects of the one God. Among these are several teachers or gurus, who have attained notoriety and importance, and as such are venerated.

Like the Hindu Deities, these are meant to express particular aspects of the Infinite, and are are used as devotional images helping the seeker visualize, concentrate on, and thus in time attain, that aspect of the Infinite in him or herself. Each of the deities represents a unique spiritual personality or essence.

The essence of each being is: Continue reading

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