Category Archives: World

Zone Ear

whaleHow does sonar work?
From Science Wire

Sonar is simply making use of an echo. When an animal or machine makes a noise, it sends sound waves into the environment around it. Those waves bounce off nearby objects, and some of them reflect back to the object that made the noise. It’s those reflected sound waves that you hear when your voice echoes back to you from a canyon. Whales and specialized machines can use reflected waves to locate distant objects and sense their shape and movement.

The range of low-frequency sonar is remarkable. Dolphins and whales can tell the difference between objects as small as a BB pellet from 50 feet (15 meters) away, and they use sonar much more than sight to find their food, families, and direction. Continue reading

Great Barrier Bleach

Reef on the brink
The Great Barrier Reef: a catastrophe laid bare
By Michael Slezak, 7 June 2016

Australia’s natural wonder is in mortal danger. Bleaching caused by climate change has killed almost a quarter of its coral this year and many scientists believe it could be too late for the rest. Using exclusive photographs and new data, a Guardian special report investigates how the reef has been devastated – and what can be done to save it

It was the smell that really got to diver Richard Vevers. The smell of death on the reef. “I can’t even tell you how bad I smelt after the dive – the smell of millions of rotting animals.” Continue reading

Jezus Starfish to Die for Man’s Sin

Great Barrier Reef Photo: The crown-of-thorns starfish is one of the biggest threats to the Great Barrier Reef, destroying around 40 per cent of the reef from Cooktown to the Whitsundays. (Reuters: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority) [But no bigger threat than the man in the suit. 7M]

COTSBot: New robot aims to terminate crown-of-thorns starfish destroying Great Barrier Reef
By Kathy McLeish,31 Aug 2015

Queensland researchers are close to completing work on an autonomous robot that will cruise the Great Barrier Reef and inject the destructive crown-of-thorns starfish with a toxic solution. The starfish is no bigger than a dinner plate, but collectively it represents one of the biggest threats to the Great Barrier Reef, already destroying around 40 per cent of the reef from Cooktown to the Whitsundays.

The COTSBot underwater robot looks like a sophisticated remote control toy submarine. But it has been designed to cruise around a designated area of coral reef, seeking out and destroying the predator crown-of-thorn starfish or COTS. Using GPS technology and powerful thrusters, the robot is designed to cruise about a metre above the coral surface and using visual recognition technology, it will look for the pests. When it sees one, an injector arm will shoot out and stab it. Continue reading

Sad Mor’ Sedeq

Who Was the Teacher of Righteousness in the Dead Sea Scrolls?
By Kerry A. Shirts, 1992 [Excerpted]

Introduction

The Dead Sea Scrolls are documents (thousands of fragments) found in caves in the deserts of Palestine around Jerusalem, during the 1940’s-50’s, written by Jewish sectaries who fled to the wilderness in opposition to the prevailing powers at Jerusalem, and specifically the Temple, approximately 200 B.C. Samuel Sandmal, notes that it is clear the community of Qumran arose because of the dissatisfaction of how the priests were running the Temple. It had divine sanction, they did not.1

The scrolls contain instructions on how to live in order to be the receivers of a new covenant the sect felt was coming. In other words the documents seem to have an apocalyptic orientation. Every book of the Bible is represented except the Book of Esther, as well as many apocryphal books, commentaries on these books with their particular application to the sect (arguably the Essenes), sectarian materials on how to join the sect, etc. Continue reading

Uncle Homo

Homunculus: The Alchemical Creation of Little People with Great Powers
By dhwty, 2015

Although science has made much progress in the last century, there are still numerous ethical issues that need to be addressed by the scientific community. One such issue is that of the creation of artificial life. For some, this is the logical progress of scientific knowledge; for others, this is a realm that should not be intruded by human beings. Concepts relating to the creation of artificial life such as genetic engineering and human cloning are relatively modern scientific ideas. In the past, however, it was in the field of alchemy that Medieval scientists sought to artificially create life. One of the beings that alchemists were purportedly able to create was the homunculus, meaning ‘little man’ in Latin.

The homunculus is first referred to in alchemical writings of the 16 th century. It is likely, however, that this concept is older than these writings. The idea that miniature fully-formed people can be created has been traced to the early Middle Ages (400 to 1000 AD), and is partly based on the Aristotelian belief that the sperm is greater than the ovum in its contribution to the production of offspring. Continue reading

Homunculus

Homunculus
A homunculus (Latin for “little man”, plural: “homunculi”) is a representation of a small human being. Popularized in sixteenth century alchemy and nineteenth century fiction, it has historically referred to the creation of a miniature, fully formed human. The concept has roots in preformationism as well as earlier folklore and alchemic traditions.

History
References to the homunculus do not appear prior to sixteenth century alchemical writings; however alchemists may have been influenced by earlier folk traditions. The mandragora, known in German as Alreona, Alraun or Alraune is one example.

In Liber de imaginibus, Paracelsus however denies that roots shaped like men grow naturally. He attacks dishonest people who carve roots to look like men and sell them as Alraun. He clarifies that the homunculus’ origins are in sperm, and that it is falsely confused with these ideas from necromancy and natural philosophy. Continue reading

Moor Eyes of Aisa

Moirai

In Greek mythology, the Moirai (Μοῖραι) (mɪrˌiː), often known in English as the Fates (Latin: Fatae), were the white-robed incarnations of destiny; their Roman equivalent was the Parcae (euphemistically the “sparing ones”). Their number became fixed at three:
– Clotho (spinner),
– Lachesis (allotter) and
– Atropos (unturnable) [also called Moira, Morta or Aisa].

The Moirai controlled the mother thread of life of every mortal from birth to death. They were independent, at the helm of necessity, directed fate, and watched that the fate assigned to every being by eternal laws might take its course without obstruction. The gods and men had to submit to them, although Zeus’s relationship with them is a matter of debate.

Some sources say Zeus is the only one who can command them (the Zeus Moiragetes), yet others suggest he was also bound to the Moirai’s dictates. In the Homeric poems Moira or Aisa, is related with the limit and end of life, and Zeus appears as the guider of destiny. In the Theogony of Hesiod, the three Moirai are personified, and are acting over the gods. Later they are daughters of Zeus and Themis, who was the embodiment of divine order and law. Continue reading

Four Times

Train Man

The Trainman 2The Trainman

You don’t get it do you, I built this place. Down here I make the rules. Down here I make the threats. Down here… I’m God.“―The Trainman to Neo

The Trainman is an exile who created and operates Mobil Avenue and is a servant of another exile program known as the Merovingian.

After saving fellow Resistance member Axel, Niobe is approached by the Trainman in a subway station. While Niobe does not know who this person is, the Trainman tells her that Zion lasted 72 hours the last time it was attacked by the Machines (referring to the fifth iteration of the Matrix). When questioned about his identity, the Trainman states that he is only an observer of the events unfolding.

Later, the Trainman is approached by Morpheus, Seraph, and Trinity onboard a train. When he sees Continue reading

Saturn in the Signs

saturn, god of time and old age, with astrology symbol, goat and water-bearersaturn, god of time and old age, with astrology symbol, goat and water-bearer

Saturn in the Signs – Interpretations

Below are the interpretations of Saturn in the zodiac signs. To read what Saturn represents in astrology, go to Lesson 5: The Planets.

Saturn in Aries

The best quality of Saturn is system and the best quality of Aries is leadership. Therefore, if you have Saturn in Aries, you can be a very capable leader, one who knows what to do and is not afraid of going out and doing it no matter what it takes or how long it takes. Combat and competitiveness spur you on to greater achievements. Self-reliance is high within you and you probably feel that you are more capable than those around you, hence you may end up doing all the work, which may antagonize you if you feel that others are not holding up their end of things. Saturn’s worst quality is selfishness and Aries worst quality Continue reading

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